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    Russia-Ukraine news highlights: Czech Republic sends tanks, infantry fighting vehicles to Ukraine; Russian envoy blames Kyiv for Kharkiv disaster

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    Russia-Ukraine news highlights: Czech Republic sends tanks, infantry fighting vehicles to Ukraine; Russian envoy blames Kyiv for Kharkiv disaster

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    Russia Ukraine war news highlights: Ukraine's General Staff reports Tuesday morning that Russia is regrouping its troops and preparing for an offensive in Donbas. The goal is to establish full control over the territory of Donetsk and Luhansk regions, the update posted on the General Staff's Facebook page says. In the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, the Russian military are focusing their efforts on taking control of Popasna and Rubizhne cities, as well as establishing full control over Mariupol, the General Staff said. Other towns and settlements in the two regions are subject to continued shelling. The Russian troops also continue to block Kharkiv, according to the General Staff. Catch all the latest development around the Russia-Ukraine War here:

    Russia-Ukraine news highlights: Czech Republic sends tanks, infantry fighting vehicles to Ukraine; Russian envoy blames Kyiv for Kharkiv disaster
    • With that it's a wrap to the LIVE updates on the Russia-Ukriane conflict for today. Do join us tomorrow for the top developments on the crisis between Moscow and Kyiv, until then stay tuned to CNBCTV18.com for more news, views and other updates. Good night.

    • Israeli FM condemns 'war crimes' in Ukraine

      Israeli Foreign Minister Yair Lapid condemned on Tuesday Russia's "war crimes" in Ukraine, intensifying Israel's criticism of Russia since the fighting in Ukraine started. "The images and testimony from Ukraine are horrific. Russian forces committed war crimes against a defenseless civilian population. I strongly condemn these war crimes," he said in a statement. Earlier on Tuesday, Prime Minister Naftali Bennett condemned the killing of civilians documented in the Ukrainian town of Bucha but stopped short of accusing Russian forces of responsibility. Israel has been restrained in its criticism of Russia, citing Bennett's efforts to broker peace. Israel also wants to keep channels open to the Russian military in Syria, where Israel often mounts air strikes on Iranian assets. "We're shocked by the terrible sights in Bucha - awful scenes - and we condemn them. The suffering of Ukrainian citizens is immense, and we're doing everything we can to assist," Bennett said during a televised news conference.

    • UN chief warns Ukraine war one of greatest challenges to international order

      UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned the Security Council on Tuesday that Russia's invasion of Ukraine is one of the greatest challenges ever to the international order "because of its nature, intensity, and consequences." Guterres said the war was putting even more pressure on the developing world, with more than 1.2 billion people particularly vulnerable to to spiking food, energy and fertilizer costs. "We are already seeing some countries move from vulnerability into crisis, and signs of serious social unrest," he added.

    • Swedish prosecutors open preliminary investigation into war crimes in Ukraine

      Swedish prosecutors have opened a preliminary investigation into possible war crimes in Ukraine and urged witnesses to come forward, the Swedish Prosecution Authority said on Tuesday. The authority said the purpose of the investigation was to secure evidence as early as possible that could be used in Swedish or international courts. It urged victims and anyone who had witnessed violence against civilians in Ukraine to contact authorities. "Based on the information available on the situation in Ukraine, there is reason to believe that serious war crimes have been committed," the Swedish Prosecution Authority said in a statement. The Authority said it currently had no suspects.

    • Spain to expel around 25 Russian diplomats, foreign minister says

      Spain will expel some 25 Russian diplomats and embassy staff from Madrid, Spanish Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Albares said on Tuesday, in response to alleged war crimes by the Russian military in Ukraine. "We have decided to expel Russian diplomats and staff from the Russian embassy in Spain who represent a threat to the interests and security of our country," he said after the weekly cabinet meeting, without ruling out further measures. A source said the Russian ambassador was not among the diplomats to be expelled. Italy, Denmark and Sweden also announced expulsions of Russian diplomats earlier on Tuesday.

    • Swedish prosecutors open preliminary investigation into war crimes in Ukraine

      Swedish prosecutors have opened a preliminary investigation into possible war crimes in Ukraine and urged witnesses to come forward, the Swedish Prosecution Authority said on Tuesday. The authority said the purpose of the investigation was to secure evidence as early as possible that could be used in Swedish or international courts. It urged victims and anyone who had witnessed violence against civilians in Ukraine to contact authorities. "Based on the information available on the situation in Ukraine, there is reason to believe that serious war crimes have been committed," the Swedish Prosecution Authority said in a statement. The Authority said it currently had no suspects.

    • Czech Republic sends tanks, infantry fighting vehicles to Ukraine - source

      The Czech Republic has sent T-72 tanks and BVP-1 infantry fighting vehicles to Ukraine, a Czech defence source told Reuters on Tuesday, confirming a local media report. Public broadcaster Czech Television initially reported the shipment, showing footage on Twitter of a train loaded with five tanks and five fighting vehicles. It said the shipment was a gift agreed with NATO allies. The broadcaster said the information was confirmed by the head of the Czech lower house's European Affairs Committee Ondrej Benesik, who told Reuters he received the information from his Christian Democrat Party's expert on defence. The source, from the Czech defence community, also confirmed that the tanks and fighting vehicles had been sent but declined to give any further details, citing security concerns.

    • Russian envoy blames Ukraine for Kharkiv humanitarian disaster

      A senior Russian diplomat blamed Ukrainian authorities on Tuesday for a humanitarian catastrophe in the city of Kharkiv, accusing the Ukrainian army of blocking humanitarian corridors and alleging that a far-right militia had set up in a school. He did not provide evidence for his assertions, which were rejected by Kharkiv's mayor as "distortions". The city of about 1.5 million people situated 25 km (15 miles) from the Russian border, has been hammered by Russian air and rocket strikes since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, reducing some neighbourhoods to rubble. Russia denies targeting civilians and has rejected as "fakes" emerging evidence of civilian killings in a town near Kyiv retaken from Russian forces. Ukraine's defence ministry said on Monday Russia was preparing to launch a fresh assault in eastern Ukraine to try to take Kharkiv, the country's second largest city, and encircle the heavily fortified eastern frontline.

    • EU proposes Russian coal ban in new sanctions

      The European Union's executive branch has proposed a ban on coal imports from Russia in what would be the first sanctions targeting the country's lucrative energy industry over its war in Ukraine. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said on Tuesday that the EU needed to increase the pressure on Russian President Vladimir Putin after what she described as the heinous crimes carried out around Kyiv. Von der Leyen said the ban on coal imports is worth 4 billion euros ($4.4 billion) per year. She added that the EU has already started working on additional sanctions, including on oil imports. Von der Leyen didn't mention natural gas. A consensus among the 27 EU member countries on targeting gas that's used to generate electricity and heat homes would be more difficult to secure. The EU gets about 40 percent of its natural gas from Russia and many EU countries, including Germany the bloc's largest economy are opposed to cutting off gas imports. 

    • Ukrainian Minister of Foreign Affairs calls for more sanctions to be imposed on Russia

      Dmytro Kuleba, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine, on Tuesday called for more sanctions to be imposed on Russia to avert 'new Buchas'. On Tuesday, Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett condemned the killing of civilians documented in the Ukrainian town of Bucha but stopped short of accusing Russian forces of responsibility. "We're shocked by the terrible sights in Bucha - awful scenes - and we condemn them. The suffering of Ukrainian citizens is immense, and we're doing everything we can to assist," Bennett said during a televised news conference. Denmark decided to expel 15 Russian diplomats following reports of mass graves being found and of civilian killings in the Ukrainian town of Bucha, the Danish Foreign Minister Jeppe Kofod said on Tuesday. 

    • Ukraine, Russian-backed separatists trade accusations over acid tank explosion

      Ukraine and Russian-backed separatist forces both reported on Tuesday that an industrial acid tank had been blown up in eastern Ukraine, creating a serious potential hazard for local people, and each pinned the blame on the other. "In Rubizhne, Luhansk region, Russian troops hit a tank with nitric acid," David Arakhamia, a member of Ukraine's negotiating team at peace talks with Russia, said on Telegram. Luhansk region governor Serhiy Haidai told residents in a message on Facebook: "Do not leave bomb shelters. If you are indoors - close windows and doors." Luhansk is part of the Donbas region where Russian-backed separatists have been fighting the Ukrainian army since 2014. The armed forces of the self-proclaimed, Russian-backed Luhansk People's Republic said on Telegram it was "Ukrainian nationalist formations" who had blown up the acid tank before retreating from the town. They said it had sent up a dangerous cloud of poison gas.

    • Russia-Ukraine war LIVE updates: Ukrainian governor warns over acid tank hit

      The governor of eastern Ukraine's Luhansk region on Tuesday urged residents to stay inside, shut windows and doors and prepare wet face masks after a Russian strike hit a tank containing nitric acid. Serhiy Haidai said on the messaging app Telegram that the incident occurred near the city of Rubizhne, which the Ukrainian military said the Russians had been trying to take over. He didn't specify what area the warning applied to. Haidai warned that nitric acid is dangerous if inhaled, swallowed and in contact with skin and mucous membranes. The Russian military has not commented on the claim, and it could not be verified independently.

    • Russia-Ukraine war LIVE updates: Safe in Greece, Ukrainian children confront trauma of war

      The drawings in a makeshift classroom in Athens tell the story of children who escaped war. Combat scenes - a helicopter dropping bombs, burning buildings, tanks and bodies on the ground - hang next to peace doves carrying olive branches. For three days a week, this small apartment in the Greek capital functions as a school and a haven for dozens of young Ukrainians and their mothers who fled Russia's invasion of Ukraine. In one room, teenagers put their thoughts on paper. "We do art therapy, which is more comfortable for kids. You don't need to talk, you need to just show me," said their teacher Regina Nasretdinova, a psychologist from Crimea. The drawing which shocked her most, she says, was by a seven-year-old boy, depicting Ukrainian soldiers killing Russian President Vladimir Putin.

    • Russia says Ukrainian allegations of war crimes are propaganda

      Russia on Tuesday pushed back against Western claims its soldiers had committed war crimes in Ukraine, casting such allegations as fake propaganda staged by Ukrainian special forces to besmirch Moscow. Since Russian troops withdrew from towns and villages around the Ukrainian capital Kyiv, Ukrainian troops have been showing journalists corpses of what they say are civilians killed by Russian forces, destroyed houses and burnt-out cars. The West says the dead civilians are evidence of war crimes. Reuters saw dead bodies in the town of Bucha but could not independently verify who was responsible for the killings.

    • Sweden to expel three Russian diplomats, foreign minister says

      Sweden will expel three Russian diplomats who are not acting in accordance with international rules, Foreign Minister Ann Linde said on Tuesday. "Today, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has ... decided to deport three Russian diplomats whose work in Sweden is not in accordance with the Vienna Convention," Linde told reporters.

    • Oil extends rally on prospect of more Russia sanctions

      Oil prices rose on Tuesday as the United States and Europe planned new sanctions to punish Russia over alleged war crimes in Ukraine, raising concerns over tighter global supply, while Iran's nuclear talks with world powers stalled. Brent crude was up $1.17, or 1.1%, to $108.70 a barrel at 0952 GMT. U.S. West Texas Intermediate was up $1.15, or 1.1%, at $104.43. "With the European Union working on new sanctions that may target Russia’s oil industry, crude prices could edge up in the near term," said FXTM analyst Lukman Otunuga. The West is planning new sanctions against Russia over civilian killings in Ukraine, with U.S President Joe Biden's national security adviser saying that new US sanctions against Moscow would be announced this week.

    • Civilian ship sinking in Mariupol, Ukraine

      Ukraine says a civilian ship is sinking in the port of the besieged city of Mariupol after Russian forces fired on it. The Ukrainian Interior Ministry said in a statement Tuesday that the ship was struck during shelling from the sea by Russia, causing a fire in the engine room. The crew was rescued, including one injured crew member, it added. The ministry said the ship was flying the flag of the Dominican Republic and posted a picture of a cargo vessel. It didn't specify how many people were on board or the nationalities of the crew members. Russian forces have been bombarding Mariupol for weeks as they try to tighten control over Ukraine's southeastern coastline.

    • US lawmakers want India to restrict sale of Russian-origin diamonds

      A bipartisan group of American lawmakers has sought the help of the Biden administration in restricting the international trade and sale of Russian-origin diamonds, in view of the massive sanctions that the US and its European allies have imposed on Moscow. In a letter to Secretary of State Tony Blinken and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, the lawmakers expressed concern that the sanctions issued by the Treasury Department to target Russia's diamond industry will have a minimal impact on Alrosa and its CEO Sergei Ivanov's ability to freely operate globally.

    • Italy expels 30 Russian diplomats over security fears

      Italy has expelled 30 Russian diplomats because of security concerns, Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio said on Tuesday, according to comments sent by a spokesman. A number of other Western governments have taken similar steps following Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

    • German president admits mistakes with Russia

      Germany's president is admitting mistakes in policy toward Russia in his previous job as foreign minister. President Frank-Walter Steinmeier served twice as ex-Chancellor Angela Merkel's foreign minister, most recently from 2013 to 2017, and before that as ex-Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's chief of staff. In that time, Germany pursued dialogue with Russian President Vladimir Putin and cultivated close energy ties.

    • Russia's top diplomat dismisses Ukraine's accusations

      Russia's top diplomat has dismissed Ukraine's accusations that Russian troops committed atrocities against its civilians as a staged provocation. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said at the start of his talks Monday with U.N. Under-Secretary-General Martin Griffiths that Moscow sees the Ukrainian claim of a massacre of civilians in Bucha outside Kyiv as a provocation that posed a direct threat to global peace and security. Lavrov noted that Russia has called for an urgent meeting of the United Nations Security Council but the U.K. that currently chairs it refused to convene it. He vowed to press the demand for holding the meeting.

    • Russia's Putin hails allies on election wins

      Russian President Vladimir Putin has congratulated the Moscow-friendly leaders of Hungary and Serbia on winning elections. In a letter sent Monday to Hungary's nationalist Prime Minister Viktor Orban whose right-wing Fidesz party won a landslide victory in Sunday's vote, Putin said that despite the difficult international situation, the further development of bilateral partnership fully conforms to the interests of peoples of Russia and Hungary, according to the Kremlin. Putin also congratulated Serbian President Alexandar Vucic on his re-election Sunday, saying that the outcome of the vote confirms a broad public support for his independent foreign policies. The Russian leader voiced hope that Vucic's activities will help further strengthen the strategic partnership between Russia and Serbia.

    • London Eye: Punches beneath a diplomatic purdah
      London Eye: The pointer to conflicting positions between India and Britain was clear from the official statements from both countries ahead of the meeting between their foreign ministers. A note from…
      Russia-Ukraine news highlights: Czech Republic sends tanks, infantry fighting vehicles to Ukraine; Russian envoy blames Kyiv for Kharkiv disaster
    • UK pledges tougher sanctions on Russia over Ukraine conflict

      Britain is working on "stepping up" sanctions against Russian President Vladimir Putin's regime on Monday, as reports emerged of alleged civilian killings on the streets of some Ukrainian regions. UK Foreign Secretary Liz Truss has flown down to Poland to meet with her Ukrainian counterpart, Minister of Foreign Affairs Dmytro Kuleba, and Polish foreign minister Zbigniew Rau. It comes ahead of talks involving the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) and G7 countries later this week.

    • Encouraged by India's effort to diversify its military or defense articles: Pentagon

      The United States is encouraged by Indian efforts to diversify the purchase of its military or defense articles, the Pentagon has said. It, however, also expressed concerns over the decision of New Delhi to purchase the S-400 missile defense system from Russia. We have been very clear with our Indian partners about our concerns over this purchase and encouraging them, as we urge many others not to purchase Russian equipment, Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby told reporters at a news conference on Monday.  

    • Ukraine reports Russian military regrouping

      Ukraine's General Staff reports Tuesday morning that Russia is regrouping its troops and preparing for an offensive in Donbas. The goal is to establish full control over the territory of Donetsk and Luhansk regions, the update posted on the General Staff's Facebook page says. In the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, the Russian military are focusing their efforts on taking control of Popasna and Rubizhne cities, as well as establishing full control over Mariupol, the General Staff said. Other towns and settlements in the two regions are subject to continued shelling. The Russian troops also continue to block Kharkiv, according to the General Staff.

    • Russia will continue to exercise its veto in UNSC on Ukraine crisis: US

      Russia will continue to exercise its veto in the United Nations Security Council on issues related to its invasion of Ukraine, the United States has said. Obviously, with Russia as a permanent member of the UN Security Council (UNSC), it will be difficult to imagine that they will not attempt to exercise their veto to block something, US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan told reporters at a White House news conference on Monday.

    • Oil climbs on prospect of fresh Russia sanctions

      Oil futures extended gains on Tuesday as the United States and Europe planned new sanctions to punish Moscow over alleged war crimes by Russian troops in Ukraine, adding to concerns about supply disruptions, while Iran nuclear talks stalled. Brent crude futures rose $1.20, or 1.1 percent, to $108.73 a barrel, while U.S. West Texas Intermediate futures were up $1.25, or 1.2 percent, at $104.53 a barrel at 0420 GMT. Both contracts briefly jumped more than $2 a barrel in early Asian trade after Japanese industry minister Koichi Hagiuda said the International Energy Agency (IEA) was still working out details for a planned second round of a coordinated oil releases.

    • Ukrainian Emergency Services release video they say shows a small sniffer dog helping a demining unit to detect explosive devices left by Russian troops.

    Russia Ukraine news LIVE:
    Ukraine's General Staff reports Tuesday morning that Russia is regrouping its troops and preparing for an offensive in Donbas. The goal is to establish full control over the territory of Donetsk and Luhansk regions, the update posted on the General Staff's Facebook page says. In the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, the Russian military are focusing their efforts on taking control of Popasna and Rubizhne cities, as well as establishing full control over Mariupol, the General Staff said. Other towns and settlements in the two regions are subject to continued shelling. The Russian troops also continue to block Kharkiv, according to the General Staff.

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