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Russia-Ukraine War Highlights: Displaced Ukrainians return to devastated town of Irpin

Russia-Ukraine War Highlights: Displaced Ukrainians return to devastated town of Irpin

Summary

Russia-Ukraine War Highlights: As the Russia-Ukraine war enters its 48th Day, the fight seems to have shifted to eastern Ukraine. Ukraine's Deputy Defense Minister Hanna Malyar said on Tuesday that officials are looking into accusations that Russia may have deployed chemical weapons in the port city of Mariupol. Meanwhile, Ukraine told Russia to release prisoners of war if it wants the Kremlin's most high-profile ally in the country freed as the United States is expected to send more weapons after Russia's strongest signal yet the war will grind on. Catch all the latest development around the Russia-Ukraine War here:

Live Updates

And with that, we wrap up today’s coverage of the ongoing conflict in Ukraine. Thank you for joining us today, and do not forget to return tomorrow when CNBC-TV18 resumes live coverage of the Russia-Ukraine war. Good night.

Zelenskyy speaks to BIden 

The Ukrainian president, Volodymyr Zelenskyy, and his US counterpart, Joe Biden, discussed additional defensive and financial aid for Kyiv as well as sanctions and alleged Russian war crimes, Zelenskyy said.

Ukrainian official slams Europe for 'closing eyes'

A member of the Ukrainian delegation, Mykhailo Podolyak, has accused European politicians of “closing eyes on Russian crimes for years”.

Oil traders to cut Russian oil purchases from May 15: Sources

Major global trading houses are planning to reduce crude and fuel purchases from Russia's state-controlled oil companies as early as May 15, sources said, to avoid falling foul of European Union sanctions on Russia. The EU has not imposed a ban on imports of Russian oil in response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, because some countries such as Germany are heavily dependent on Russian oil and do not have the infrastructure in place to swap to alternatives. L5N2VO3PE]

Trading companies are, however, winding down purchases from Russian energy group Rosneft as they seek to comply with language in existing EU sanctions that were intended to limit Russia's access to the international financial system, the sources said. The wording of EU sanctions exempts oil purchases from Rosneft or Gazpromneft, which are listed in the legislation, deemed as "necessary for ensuring critical energy supply" for Europe.

Traders are wrestling with what "necessary" means, the sources said. It may cover an oil refinery receiving Russian oil through a captive pipeline, but it may not cover the buying and selling of Russian oil by intermediaries. They are cutting purchases to ensure they comply by May 15, when EU restrictions take effect.

World Bank: 1.3% lower GDP growth for India due to Ukraine war
Russia's war in Ukraine is likely to result in a significant 1.3 percent lower GDP growth for India and 2.3 percentage points lower income growth, a top World Bank official has said, even as the…
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Russia-Ukraine conflict | Infosys has no plans to do business with Russian clients: CEO Salil Parekh
The company has started transitioning all of its work from its centres in Russia, where it employs less than 100 employees, to the centres outside Russia.
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Russia closes in on last holdout in Mariupol, prepares for new offensive

More than 1,000 Ukrainian marines have surrendered in the port of Mariupol, Russia's defence ministry said on Wednesday, signalling that it had moved closer to capturing the ruined city, its main strategic target in eastern Ukraine.Taking the Azovstal industrial district, where the marines have been holed up, would give the Russians full control of Mariupol, Ukraine's main Sea of Azov port, and reinforce a southern land corridor before an expected new offensive in the country's east.

Surrounded and bombarded by Russian troops for weeks and the focus of some of the fiercest fighting in the war, Mariupol would be the first major city to fall since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24.

Citing Russia's 'shameful pattern of abusing its veto privilege', US says co-sponsoring UNGA resolution on UNSC veto

Citing Russia's shameful pattern of abusing its veto privilege over the years, the US has said it is co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution that would automatically convene a meeting of the UNGA after a veto has been cast in the Security Council. There are times when a Permanent Member of the UN Security Council will conclude that a particular resolution will not advance international peace and security and will veto that resolution, US Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield said on Tuesday.

She said when a Permanent Member casts a veto in the Council, that member should be prepared to explain why the resolution at issue would not have furthered the maintenance of international peace and security. Unfortunately, not all members of the Security Council share this sentiment. We are particularly concerned by Russia's shameful pattern of abusing its veto privilege over the past two decades, including its vetoes to kill a UN observer mission in Georgia, block accountability measures and chemical weapons investigations in Syria, prevent the establishment of a criminal tribunal on the downing of flight MH-17 over Ukraine, and protect President Putin from condemnation over his unprovoked and unjust war of choice against Ukraine, she said.

Germany irritated by Ukraine's snub of a presidential visit

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz on Wednesday criticised a diplomatic snub by Ukraine for his country's president and defended Berlin's record on delivering weapons to Kyiv amid tensions that have flared at a delicate moment in German policymaking on the war. President Frank-Walter Steinmeier, Germany's largely ceremonial head of state, had hoped to travel to Ukraine on Wednesday with his Polish and Baltic counterparts. But he said Tuesday that his presence apparently ... wasn't wanted in Kyiv. The German newspaper Bild quoted an unidentified Ukrainian diplomat as saying that Steinmeier was not welcome at the moment, pointing to his close relations with Russia in the past.

At UN, Nadia Murad launches guidance on collecting rape in war evidence

Human rights activist Nadia Murad launched global guidelines at the United Nations on Wednesday on how to safely and effectively collect evidence from survivors and witnesses of sexual violence in conflict. Murad, who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2018 for her efforts to end rape as a weapon of war, first addressed the U.N. Security Council in 2015 at the age of 22 - describing the torture and rape she suffered while enslaved by Islamic State a year earlier.

Dubbed the Murad Code, the new guidance was developed with British funding by campaign group Nadia's Initiative and the Institute for International CriminalInvestigations, aiming to reduce the risk of further trauma for survivors when providing evidence.

Zelenskyy: War will become ‘endless bloodbath’ without more weapons

Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskiy has released a new video in which he warns that the war will become an “endless bloodbath, spreading misery, suffering, and destruction” without additional weaponry. Speaking in English, Zelenskiy says Ukraine has been defending itself against Russia “much longer than the invaders planned”.

But Russia still has the capacity to attack “not only against Ukraine”, Zelenskyy continues: "Poland, Moldova, Romania, and the Baltic states will become the next targets if the freedom of Ukraine falls."

More weapons were needed to “save millions of Ukrainians as well as millions of Europeans”, he says: "We need heavy artillery, armoured vehicles, air defence systems and combat aircraft."

Zelenskyy concludes the video by saying: "Freedom must be armed better than tyranny."

European rights experts find 'clear patterns of Russian war crimes in Ukraine

A mission of experts set up by Organization for Security and Cooperation and Europe (OSCE) nations has found evidence of war crimes and crimes against humanity by Russia in Ukraine, an initial report by the mission said on Wednesday. The mission was set up last month by 45 of the OSCE's 57 participating countries to look into possible offences, including war crimes in Ukraine, and to pass on information to bodies such as international tribunals. Russia opposed it.

"The mission found clear patterns of IHL (international humanitarian law) violations by the Russian forces," the report said, citing failures to take necessary precautions, act proportionately or spare sites like schools and hospitals.

Yellen to convene meeting on war-related food security issues next week

US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Wednesday said she was deeply concerned about the impact of Russia's war in Ukraine on global food prices and supply, noting that over 275 million people worldwide were facing acute food insecurity.

Yellen said she would convene other leaders during next week's Spring Meetings of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank to discuss possible solutions to help the poorest, who spend a larger share of their income on food.

Multilateral development banks were providing financing to strengthen domestic food production, bolster social safety nets, and unlock trade finance, but also needed to make longer-term investments to address the underlying vulnerabilities in food systems, she said, without providing any details.

European rights experts find "clear patterns" of Russian war crimes in Ukraine

A mission of experts set up by Organization for Security and Cooperation and Europe (OSCE) nations has found evidence of war crimes and crimes against humanity by Russia in Ukraine, an initial report by the mission said on Wednesday. The mission was set up last month by 45 of the OSCE's 57 participating countries to look into possible offences, including war crimes in Ukraine, and to pass on information to bodies such as international tribunals. Russia opposed it. "The mission found clear patterns of international humanitarian law (IHL) violations by the Russian forces," the report said, citing failures to take necessary precautions, act proportionately or spare sites like schools and hospitals.

UK sanctions Russian separatists in breakaway regions

Britain said on Wednesday it had imposed new sanctions on 206 individuals in response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, including 178 who it said were involved in propping up Russian-backed breakaway regions of Ukraine. The Foreign Office said individuals sanctioned include Alexander Ananchenko and Sergey Kozlov, which it described as self-styled Prime Minister and Chair of Government of the so-called Donetsk and Luhansk People's Republics. Further family members of Russian oligarchs were also targeted, including Pavel Ezubov, cousin of Russian billionaire Oleg Deripaska, and Nigina Zairova, executive assistant to businessman Mikhail Fridman.