• SENSEX
    NIFTY 50
Wildlife

New England seeing a huge spike in beached sea turtles

Updated : March 28, 2019 02:01 PM IST

The number of warm water turtles stuck on beaches has risen dramatically in the past decade, according to the Mass Audubon’s Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary. This year, volunteers recovered 829 helpless turtles washed up on the sand — about half of them dead including some frozen solid. That’s nearly twice what they found in 2016 and 10 times more than in 2008.

Karen Dourdeville, right, brings in another deceased Kemp's ridley turtle for cataloguing and bagging by James Neilsen, left, at the Audubon Society's Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary in Wellfleet, USA.  (Steve Heaslip/The Cape Cod Times via AP, File)
Karen Dourdeville, right, brings in another deceased Kemp's ridley turtle for cataloguing and bagging by James Neilsen, left, at the Audubon Society's Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary in Wellfleet, USA.  (Steve Heaslip/The Cape Cod Times via AP, File)
National Aquarium staff member Stehle Harris counts banana boxes containing Kemp's ridley turtles awaiting release in New Smyrna Beach, Florida. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
National Aquarium staff member Stehle Harris counts banana boxes containing Kemp's ridley turtles awaiting release in New Smyrna Beach, Florida. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
A Kemp's ridley turtle sits in a box awaiting release by staff members of the National Aquarium in New Smyrna Beach. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
A Kemp's ridley turtle sits in a box awaiting release by staff members of the National Aquarium in New Smyrna Beach. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
National Aquarium staff members Stehle Harris, left, Scott Perich, second from left, Nicole Guyton and Ellen Dickinson, right, carry loggerhead turtles to the waters of the Atlantic Ocean. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
National Aquarium staff members Stehle Harris, left, Scott Perich, second from left, Nicole Guyton and Ellen Dickinson, right, carry loggerhead turtles to the waters of the Atlantic Ocean. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
New England Aquarium clinical intern Megan Bradley, of Johnston, Iowa, right, uses a flashlight while examining a Kemp's ridley turtle at a marine animal rehabilitation centre near Boston. Most rescued turtles suffer from compromised immune systems and pneumonia due to hypothermia. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
New England Aquarium clinical intern Megan Bradley, of Johnston, Iowa, right, uses a flashlight while examining a Kemp's ridley turtle at a marine animal rehabilitation centre near Boston. Most rescued turtles suffer from compromised immune systems and pneumonia due to hypothermia. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
A loggerhead turtle is examined while resting in a crate at a marine animal rehabilitation centre near Boston. Some experts think New England’s spike in cold-stunned turtles is a climate change story with a twist: the hook-like projection of Cape Cod into the Atlantic helps trap turtles drawn there by warming waters but weakened when the ocean cools down. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
A loggerhead turtle is examined while resting in a crate at a marine animal rehabilitation centre near Boston. Some experts think New England’s spike in cold-stunned turtles is a climate change story with a twist: the hook-like projection of Cape Cod into the Atlantic helps trap turtles drawn there by warming waters but weakened when the ocean cools down. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
A loggerhead turtle swims in a tank at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. Warmer waters in Necentreand are proving attractive to sea turtles, but with a catch. Many are swimming north only to be trapped by cooling waters. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
A loggerhead turtle swims in a tank at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. Warmer waters in Necentreand are proving attractive to sea turtles, but with a catch. Many are swimming north only to be trapped by cooling waters. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
New England Aquarium clinical intern Megan Bradley, of Johnston, Iowa, hands only front, examines the jaws of a Kemp's ridley turtle at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. In the past decade, many turtles have been moving farther northward from the Gulf of Mexico into the warming waters of the Gulf of Maine to feed on crabs, mussels and shrimp. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
New England Aquarium clinical intern Megan Bradley, of Johnston, Iowa, hands only front, examines the jaws of a Kemp's ridley turtle at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. In the past decade, many turtles have been moving farther northward from the Gulf of Mexico into the warming waters of the Gulf of Maine to feed on crabs, mussels and shrimp. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
New England Aquarium clinical intern Megan Bradley, of Johnston, Iowa, left, uses calipers to measure a Kemp's ridley turtle at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. The number of warm water turtles stuck on beaches here has risen dramatically in the past decade, according to the Mass Audubon's Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
New England Aquarium clinical intern Megan Bradley, of Johnston, Iowa, left, uses calipers to measure a Kemp's ridley turtle at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. The number of warm water turtles stuck on beaches here has risen dramatically in the past decade, according to the Mass Audubon's Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
New England Aquarium a Kemp's ridley turtle swims in a tank at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. Some experts think New England’s spike in cold-stunned turtles is a climate change story with a twist: the hook-like projection of Cape Cod into the Atlantic helps trap turtles drawn there by warming waters but weakened when the ocean cools down. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
New England Aquarium a Kemp's ridley turtle swims in a tank at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. Some experts think New England’s spike in cold-stunned turtles is a climate change story with a twist: the hook-like projection of Cape Cod into the Atlantic helps trap turtles drawn there by warming waters but weakened when the ocean cools down. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
A Kemp's ridley turtle is measured using a tape measure at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. Most rescued turtles suffer from compromised immune systems and pneumonia due to hypothermia. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
A Kemp's ridley turtle is measured using a tape measure at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. Most rescued turtles suffer from compromised immune systems and pneumonia due to hypothermia. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Live TV

Ask Our Experts CNBC TV18

Send your queries on investments and have them answered by our experts

Enter your details

Post