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In pictures: Here is a selection of the most striking satellite images captured during the decade

Updated : December 31, 2019 01:50 PM IST

There has been no shortage of big news over the last decade. Spanning the globe, some stories were expected while others caught the world off guard. Some were so massive they were visible from space, captured through state-of-the-art imaging satellites.

This image provided by Maxar Technologies shows Simonton, Texas, west of Houston, on November 20, 2016, top, and on August 30, 2017. America’s hurricane luck ran out in 2017. Three powerful hurricanes — Harvey, Irma and Maria — slammed into different parts of the country, causing $265 billion damage in four weeks. Harvey parked itself over Houston and unleashed a downpour. It killed 68 people and set a US record for the amount of rain recorded from a storm: 60.58 inches. Harvey’s $120 billion in damages ranks as the second-costliest US storm behind only Katrina in 2005. (Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies via AP)
This image provided by Maxar Technologies shows Simonton, Texas, west of Houston, on November 20, 2016, top, and on August 30, 2017. America’s hurricane luck ran out in 2017. Three powerful hurricanes — Harvey, Irma and Maria — slammed into different parts of the country, causing $265 billion damage in four weeks. Harvey parked itself over Houston and unleashed a downpour. It killed 68 people and set a US record for the amount of rain recorded from a storm: 60.58 inches. Harvey’s $120 billion in damages ranks as the second-costliest US storm behind only Katrina in 2005. (Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies via AP)
This November 2018, image provided by Maxar Technologies shows fires in Paradise, California. What happened in Paradise has become a cautionary tale about the kind of devastation that is possible when erratic winds carry sparks across a warming planet. Eighty-five people died. Some perished in cars on roads so choked by the traffic they couldn’t outrun the flames. Roughly 19,000 homes, businesses and other buildings were destroyed. (Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies via AP)
This November 2018, image provided by Maxar Technologies shows fires in Paradise, California. What happened in Paradise has become a cautionary tale about the kind of devastation that is possible when erratic winds carry sparks across a warming planet. Eighty-five people died. Some perished in cars on roads so choked by the traffic they couldn’t outrun the flames. Roughly 19,000 homes, businesses and other buildings were destroyed. (Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies via AP)
This July 2017 image shows the Old City of Mosul, Iraq, after a punishing nine-month battle to oust Islamic State militants. The Islamic State group emerged in 2014 during chaotic conflicts in Syria and Iraq. The militants seized towns and cities, quickly gaining control of one-third of both countries. IS created what no other extremist group had before: a so-called Islamic caliphate, with the Syrian city of Raqqa as its capital. In response to the threat, a military campaign by a US-led international coalition slowly chipped away at the group’s territory. (Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies via AP)
This July 2017 image shows the Old City of Mosul, Iraq, after a punishing nine-month battle to oust Islamic State militants. The Islamic State group emerged in 2014 during chaotic conflicts in Syria and Iraq. The militants seized towns and cities, quickly gaining control of one-third of both countries. IS created what no other extremist group had before: a so-called Islamic caliphate, with the Syrian city of Raqqa as its capital. In response to the threat, a military campaign by a US-led international coalition slowly chipped away at the group’s territory. (Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies via AP)
This March 2017 image shows a satellite image of Fiery Cross Reef in Spratly island chain in the South China Sea. Across the sprawling and the strategic South China Sea, nearly 70 disputed islands, reefs and atolls are occupied by five claimants. China, Taiwan, Vietnam, the Philippines and Malaysia have built airstrips, harbours, barracks and other infrastructure for both civilian and military use. Only China has created new islands by piling sand and concrete atop coral reefs. That has upset the balance of power in the region, strengthening China’s claim to the entire waterway. It also has further harmed the fragile environment already threatened by overfishing, pollution and the harvesting of giant clams by Chinese fishermen.(Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies via AP)
This March 2017 image shows a satellite image of Fiery Cross Reef in Spratly island chain in the South China Sea. Across the sprawling and the strategic South China Sea, nearly 70 disputed islands, reefs and atolls are occupied by five claimants. China, Taiwan, Vietnam, the Philippines and Malaysia have built airstrips, harbours, barracks and other infrastructure for both civilian and military use. Only China has created new islands by piling sand and concrete atop coral reefs. That has upset the balance of power in the region, strengthening China’s claim to the entire waterway. It also has further harmed the fragile environment already threatened by overfishing, pollution and the harvesting of giant clams by Chinese fishermen.(Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies via AP)
This December 2018 image shows temporary shelters that have been erected in the Kutupalong area of Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. In August 2017, Myanmar’s military launched a brutal, sweeping crackdown against the country’s Rohingya Muslim minority, burning villages, methodically raping women and girls, and killing thousands, including children. Human-rights groups have described the assault as a calculated campaign of ethnic cleansing and genocide designed to drive the Rohingya from the Buddhist-majority country. The bloodshed forced more than 700,000 Rohingya to flee to neighbouring Bangladesh, where traumatized survivors crowded onto a stretch of low, rolling hills that would be transformed into the world’s largest refugee camp.(Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies via AP)
This December 2018 image shows temporary shelters that have been erected in the Kutupalong area of Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. In August 2017, Myanmar’s military launched a brutal, sweeping crackdown against the country’s Rohingya Muslim minority, burning villages, methodically raping women and girls, and killing thousands, including children. Human-rights groups have described the assault as a calculated campaign of ethnic cleansing and genocide designed to drive the Rohingya from the Buddhist-majority country. The bloodshed forced more than 700,000 Rohingya to flee to neighbouring Bangladesh, where traumatized survivors crowded onto a stretch of low, rolling hills that would be transformed into the world’s largest refugee camp.(Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies via AP)
Published : December 31, 2019 01:40 PM IST
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