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Urban Indians are escaping metros to great fresh air: Report

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India is home to several of the world’s worst air polluted cities. To escape this pollution, urban Indians are booking holiday trips to places with fresh air. The trend of leaving cities to escape bad air quality has now been termed ‘escape travel’, joining the ranks of other travel trends like ‘revenge travel’.

Urban Indians are escaping metros to great fresh air: Report
Travellers from major Indian metros are booking their vacations months in advance to escape terrible air conditions and get a breath of fresh air. Online travel marketplaces are also reporting an increase in the number of last-minute bookings from cities like Delhi, Mumbai and others to escape deteriorating air conditions, reported Economic Times.
The trend of leaving cities to escape bad air quality has now been termed  ‘escape travel’, joining the ranks of other travel trends like ‘revenge travel’. ‘Revenge travel’ was when people headed out for vacation as soon as lockdowns eased and travel restrictions were lifted.
Trip stacking was another trend that emerged after the COVID pandemic. The trend of ‘trip stacking’ involves booking multiple trips to different locations so that travellers have the option to pick what they want closer to the vacation date.
Tourists flock to locations with good air and plenty of natural beauty in ‘escape travel’. Destinations like Goa, Wayanad, Coorg, Manali and Ooty have emerged as some of the more popular destinations. Other popular locations are tourist destinations that are easily drivable for a weekend trip from major metro regions.
"Beach destinations are a favourite pick amongst travellers. We have seen an increase of 55-60% in search queries for beach destinations like Goa and Andamans for travel in November," Aloke Bajpai, group CEO and co-founder at Ixigo told ET.
Winter months typically represent the ‘in season’ months for several of the destinations, with tourists heading to the hills to catch the first snowfall of the season and beachgoers heading to the south to catch some much-needed sun.
At least 30.7 percent of annual deaths in India could be directly attributable to air pollution, researchers from Harvard University, University College London and other institutions found in a study published in the journal Environmental Research in February.
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