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    US startup bags patent of new tech; could generate electricity from ocean, clothing, cars, and buildings

    US startup bags patent of new tech; could generate electricity from ocean, clothing, cars, and buildings

    US startup bags patent of new tech; could generate electricity from ocean, clothing, cars, and buildings
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    By Vijay Anand   IST (Published)

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    Distributed embedded energy converter technologies (DEEC-Tec) uses clean power generated from ocean and river waves, currents, and tides and eventually every day movements and dynamic motions into usable, everyday energy.

    A smalltime technology startup in the US earned a very curious patent — distributed embedded energy converter technologies (DEEC-Tec), using which clean power generated from ocean and river waves, currents, and tides and eventually every day movements and dynamic motions can be turned into usable, everyday energy.
    According to US-based The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), DEEC-Tec is gaining momentum.
    "The DEEC-Tec domain has legs and is growing,” said Blake Boren, a senior engineer at NREL, and the lead inventor on the patent along with Jochem Weber, chief engineer for NREL’s water power programme, in a report on NREL.
    DEEC-Tec might very well have the legs to move into buildings, clothing, and roads, but it is starting in the ocean. “The patent shows that we’re gaining momentum in a fruitful area of research,” Boren said, as per the NREL report.
    "In the DEEC-Tec domain, individual energy converters work together, like muscle cells, to create a larger structure, much like the sea snake. Most devices use one generator to convert ocean energy into usable, clean, and renewable sources of energy, including electricity. But DEEC-Tec amasses its many tiny converters to form one larger, often flexible energy converter," explains the NREL report.
    This potentially means anything physical that creates motion builds up kinetic energy that can be converted into usable energy.
    For example, NREL's report explains, DEEC-Tec-based wave energy converters could look like balloons that contract and expand, snakes that undulate, or paddles that twist and bend to harness ocean wave energy.
    High costs are one of the last major hurdles that the marine energy industry must overcome to start powering those communities. And DEEC-Tec’s flexible archetypes could offer an especially cost-effective way to harness wave energy, NREL said.
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