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Chandrayaan 2: What foreign media say about India's historic moon mission

Chandrayaan-2: What foreign media say about India's historic moon mission

Chandrayaan-2: What foreign media say about India's historic moon mission
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By Kanishka Gupta  Sept 6, 2019 3:06:23 PM IST (Published)

While the national media is celebrating the moment, updating with every progress of the mission, here’s how the international media covers the first-ever mission to explore Lunar South Pole by Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

Chandrayaan-2, India's second mission to the Moon, is all set to land near the lunar south pole tonight. Chandrayaan-2's lander Vikram is currently revolving around the Moon and will begin its descent on to the lunar surface shortly after midnight, between 1:30 and 2:30 am IST.

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While the national media is celebrating the moment, updating with every progress of the mission, here’s how the international media covers the first-ever mission to explore Lunar South Pole by Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).
The New York Times
“Around the world, scientists are closely watching to see if India can land safely at an unexplored region near the moon’s South Pole. Space has become a bit of a craze in India. Riding on the homegrown mission are the hopes of a nation that has increasingly asserted its technological prowess on the world stage.”
“And space has offered India’s government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his populist Bharatiya Janata Party, a welcome distraction from dismal job numbers, declining economic growth and conflict in Kashmir.”
BBC
“The South Pole of the Moon is still a largely unexplored area, and India is targeting a spot that no other landing craft has reached so far. ISRO says the lunar South Pole is especially interesting because the surface area that remains in shadow here is much larger than that of the Moon's North Pole. This means that there is a possibility of water in areas that are permanently shadowed.”
“This unexplored region is also especially important because in the near future, possibly by 2024, the US space agency Nasa aims to place boots back on the Moon through its Artemis Mission, and wants to target landing near the South Pole. India's mission will therefore give the Americans much needed data of this unchartered territory.”
CNN
“ISRO tends to utilize the talent it has in-house and saves money on not hiring contractors. In 2017, India broke a world record when it launched 104 satellites in one mission, while operating a low-cost budget. Earlier this year, Modi announced that India had shot down one of its own satellites in a military show of force, making it one of four countries to have achieved that feat.”
“Leaving the Earth's orbit in 2014, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars, with its Mangalyaan probe. India's Mars Orbiter Mission cost just $74 million, less than half of NASA's $187 million to launch the Mars-bound Maven orbiter in 2013.”
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