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Apple search engine might get delayed as top talent moves to Google

Apple search engine might get delayed as top talent moves to Google

Apple search engine might get delayed as top talent moves to Google
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By Pihu Yadav  Nov 14, 2022 5:12:32 PM IST (Published)

Rumours of Apple developing its own search engine gained traction following the release of iOS 14 in 2020.

Apple's search technology is reportedly facing a setback as the company loses its top talent to Google.

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In 2018, Apple acquired a machine learning startup Laserlike, which was founded by three former Google search engineers — Anand Shukla, Srinivasan Venkatachary and Steven Baker. Now, the engineers have gone back to where they started from, according to a report by The Information.
As per the report, Srinivasan Venkatachary has now returned to Google, and is reportedly the company's new vice-president of engineering. Venkatachary reports to James Manyika, senior vice-president of technology and society. Baker and Shukla are now both on Manyika's team.
However, it's unclear whether all three left Apple at the same time, or if Venkatachary is the most recent departure, said the report.
Laserlike built a search app that used discovery and personalisation machine learning techniques to provide news, web, video, and local content relevant to each user. The app was discontinued post the acquisition. 
While Apple does not have a search engine of its own, the search team at the company is responsible for Spotlight, Siri Suggestions, and answers provided by ‌Siri‌. The team consists of at least 200 employees. The Information also added that Apple is at least four years away from a fully-developed search engine that could rival Google.
Rumours of Apple developing its own search engine gained traction following the release of iOS 14 in 2020.
In an investor note released by financial advisor Bernstein's Toni Sacconaghi in 2021, the analyst claims Google's payment to Apple to maintain the status quo could reach $15 billion in the year and has the potential to reach $20 billion in 2022. “We have noted in prior research that (Google) is likely paying to ensure Microsoft doesn’t outbid it. That said, with payments likely to approach $18 – $20 billion in FY 22, it is not implausible that Google could revisit its strategy,” the note read.
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