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This article is more than 3 year old.

Here's why startups like Xiaomi, Uber and Airbnb succeed

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Startups don’t win just because of better technology or features; they win because they solve real problems that demand clear and simple solutions, says Thomas Appong, founder of Alltopstartups.com in his report 'Learning From Billion Dollar Startups'.

Here's why startups like Xiaomi, Uber and Airbnb succeed
Startup as an industry has evolved over the years with hundreds of them being introduced each year across the world. In recent years, startups have been redefined with the founders focusing primarily on innovations, making the best out of technology. However, not many enjoy the fruits.
Startups don’t win just because of better technology or features; they win because they solve real problems that demand clear and simple solutions, says Thomas Appong, founder of Alltopstartups.com in his report 'Learning From Billion Dollar Startups'.
Appong's report throws light on some of the most successful startups and decodes the reasons behind their unstoppable success.
Here's a look at some of them:
Xiaomi: China's Smartphone Sensation
China’s largest smartphone vendor is one of them. The company, in just four years, turned the biggest smartphone seller in the country. It was recognised as the world’s most highly valued startup in December 2014, after closing a new $1.1 billion round of funding at a $46 billion valuation.
Except Apple Inc. and Google Inc., very few tech companies can compete with the firm, said the report.
The company keeps costs down by selling most of its products online and having its fans help it do marketing through word of mouth. It has been proven as a great formula so far. However, it’s being tested further as the company is looking to expand overseas.
Xiaomi has always maintained it is actually an Internet company, not a smartphone one, the report said.
Why Uber is Booming
The founders struck gold in 2009 as the idea was a win-win for all. Passengers loved the convenience; drivers found an extra source of income and Uber built a business by pocketing 20% of each ride. With its model proven, Uber plotted a rapid global expansion, bringing the service to more than 270 cities around the world in five years, according to the report.
Among the many problems Uber is tackling, as mentioned in the report, are: poor cab infrastructure in some cities, poor service and fulfillment–including dirty cabs, poor customer experience, late cars, drivers unwilling to accept credit cards, and more.
How Airbnb Disrupted The Hotel Economy
Despite the initial turbulence over the idea of the business and the difficulties in distinguishing itself from other firms, the company later came up with rebranding plans, focusing on  becoming a more inclusive hospitality brand.
Claiming that he was able to distill it all into a single concept—belonging, Brian Chesky, CEO of the company, explains, “Airbnb is about belonging anywhere. The brand shouldn’t say we’re about community, or our international , or renting homes—it’s about belonging."
In February 2011, Airbnb announced its 1 millionth booking since its inception in August 2008. Then, in January 2012, Airbnb announced its 5 millionth night booked internationally through the service. In June 2012, the company announced 10 million nights booked, doubling business in 5 months.
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