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World Chess Championship: Imperious Magnus Carslen wins fifth crown

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Reigning world chess champion and World No 1 Magnus Carlsen of Norway breezed to an easy victory over Russia's Ian Nepomniachtchi. Carlsen won his fifth world title after the Russian resigned in 49 moves in the 11th game.

World Chess Championship: Imperious Magnus Carslen wins fifth crown
Reigning Chess World Champion Magnus Carlsen capped a commanding display on the chequered board by winning the 11th game against Russian  Grandmaster Ian Nepomniachtchi to clinch his fifth world title in Dubai on Friday.
Carlsen won the title 7.5 points to Nepomniachtchi's 3.5 to win the most lopsided world championship since José Raúl Capablanca’s triumph over Emanuel Lasker exactly 100 years ago in Havana. In that match, Capablanca won by a four-game margin without a single defeat.
In Friday's 3hr 21min clincher, Nepomniachtchi resigned after 49 moves as Carlsen reasserted his supremacy in the world of chess.
Carlsen was reserved, given the one-sided nature of his victory. “It’s hard to feel that great joy when the situation was so comfortable to begin with, but I’m happy with a very good performance overall," Carlsen said during the post-game press conference.
The Norwegian grandmaster assessed his performance throughout the course of the match and said there were things he could have done differently. "I’m happy with my play, very proud of my effort in the sixth game, and that sort of laid the foundation for everything. The final score is probably a bit more lopsided than it could have been, but that’s the way I think some of the other matches also could have gone if I had gotten a lead," Carlsen said.
World No 1 Carlsen's four previous championship victories came against Viswanathan Anand (2013 and 2013), Russia's Sergey Karjakin (2016) and Italian-American Fabiano Caruana (2018).
"The match got a little more tense than I expected, but anyway the tension is not a reason to overlook some simple things you would never overlook in a blitz game. What can I say? I should find out why it did happen and improve," Nepomniachtchi said.
Carlsen takes home 60% of the 2 million euro prize money that was up for grabs.
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