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Sorrow revisited: Re-creating Katrina's muck in New Orleans

Updated : March 20, 2019 12:16 PM IST

A project of the donor-funded nonprofit group Levees.org, the Flooded House Museum is unique among the New Orleans' monuments to Katrina's destruction. There are markers at various sites, including some of the places where floodwalls gave way. But there's nothing like this re-creation by artists Aaron Angelo and Ken Conner. They were tasked with depicting what homeowners would have found once they were allowed back into the area in the months after the storm hit, once the water had receded and roads were cleared of debris. The permanent exhibit was set for a public unveiling on Saturday.

Artist Aaron Angelo takes a sledgehammer to the leg of a baby grand piano in a house where two rooms are being transformed to look as they might have looked once floodwaters receded following Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
Artist Aaron Angelo takes a sledgehammer to the leg of a baby grand piano in a house where two rooms are being transformed to look as they might have looked once floodwaters receded following Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
Artist Ken Conner applies “mold” to the walls of a house in New Orleans being transformed to look as it might have looked when homeowners returned after flood waters preceded following Hurricane Katrina. (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
Artist Ken Conner applies “mold” to the walls of a house in New Orleans being transformed to look as it might have looked when homeowners returned after flood waters preceded following Hurricane Katrina. (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
Artist Aaron Angelo paints a rug to make it look as though it has been in floodwater for weeks in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
Artist Aaron Angelo paints a rug to make it look as though it has been in floodwater for weeks in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
Donated toys, art and other household items, some covered in grey paint to simulate flood damage, sit in a pile in a New Orleans house where artists are working to make two rooms appear like they might have looked once floodwaters receded following Hurricane Katrina.  (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
Donated toys, art and other household items, some covered in grey paint to simulate flood damage, sit in a pile in a New Orleans house where artists are working to make two rooms appear like they might have looked once floodwaters receded following Hurricane Katrina.  (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
A room in a New Orleans house that is being made to look as it might have looked once homeowners returned after floodwaters receded following Hurricane Katrina and catastrophic levee failures in 2005. (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
A room in a New Orleans house that is being made to look as it might have looked once homeowners returned after floodwaters receded following Hurricane Katrina and catastrophic levee failures in 2005. (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
Photo shows a room in a New Orleans house, made to look as it might have looked on the day before Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans and levee failures led to catastrophic flooding. (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
Photo shows a room in a New Orleans house, made to look as it might have looked on the day before Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans and levee failures led to catastrophic flooding. (AP Photo/Kevin McGill)
Image taken from video, piano keys, stained and damaged to look as though they were in a once-flooded room, part of a re-creation of flood damage in a new exhibit in New Orleans by the organization Levees.org.  (AP Photo/Stacey Plaisance)
Image taken from video, piano keys, stained and damaged to look as though they were in a once-flooded room, part of a re-creation of flood damage in a new exhibit in New Orleans by the organization Levees.org.  (AP Photo/Stacey Plaisance)
A stuffed toy, stained to look as though it was soaked in flood waters, is part of a re-creation of flood damage in a new exhibit in New Orleans by the organization Levees.org.  (AP Photo/Stacey Plaisance)
A stuffed toy, stained to look as though it was soaked in flood waters, is part of a re-creation of flood damage in a new exhibit in New Orleans by the organization Levees.org.  (AP Photo/Stacey Plaisance)
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