NASA’s Hubble telescope back online a month after 'death'

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The NASA team said this happened as the power regulator’s voltage went above the 5V threshold.

NASA’s Hubble telescope back online a month after 'death'
On the eve of the 51st anniversary of the Apollo moon landing in 1969 and Jeff Bezos’ historic flight to the edge of space on July 20, space enthusiasts have something more to cheer about.
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announced that the Hubble Space Telescope (Hubble) is back online 30 days after it went offline.
NASA had earlier said they were facing technical difficulties in collecting space science data through the 31-year-old Hubble.
NASA’s technical team examined the Hubble and got it back in action just on time for two key milestones. Repairing space telescopes is difficult and the month-long gap led to rumours about Hubble’s ‘death.’
All instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope are now in operational status, and science data is once again being collected to further our understanding of the universe, NASA Hubble’s official handle tweeted on July 17.
On June 13, the Hubble’s main computer no longer received a ‘keep-alive’ signal from the payload computer. The NASA team said this happened as the power regulator’s voltage went above the 5V threshold. A secondary protection circuit ensures that this does not exceed or fall below the 5V required to operate the payload computer.
The main computer immediately put the Hubble in safe mode to shield the sensitive equipment, software and hardware. The power and communications systems on the space telescope were still on while the repair work was undertaken.
The ground commands used to reset the power control unit did not function. NASA’s experts decided to switch to the backup payload computer. The process of switching back to the backup payload computer started on July 15 and the Hubble telescope was fully operational by July 17.
The Hubble had experienced some problems in March 2021 too.