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Politics

Venice Biennale invites heavy thinking on political issues

Updated : May 11, 2019 06:51 AM IST

Political issues that excite newsprint, the airwaves and social media are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, like so much laundry hung out to dry in the lagoon breeze. American curator Ralph Rugoff, director of London's Hayward Gallery, titled the main exhibition "May You Live in Interesting Times," which opens Saturday and runs through Nov. 24. Here's a quick look at the exhibition.

Venice Biennale President Paolo Baratta, right, and US curator of the Biennale Ralph Rugoff are engulfed by a smoke effect as they pose at the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
Venice Biennale President Paolo Baratta, right, and US curator of the Biennale Ralph Rugoff are engulfed by a smoke effect as they pose at the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
A man looks the
A man looks the "Mondo Cane" installation by artists Jos de Gruyter & Harald Thys shown at Belgium's pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
A woman takes a picture of the
A woman takes a picture of the "Mondo Cane" installation by artists Jos de Gruyter & Harald Thys shown at the Belgium pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
An actress performs at the
An actress performs at the "Deep See Blue Surrounding You" installation by artist Laure Prouvost, at the French pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni).
A visitor stands next to
A visitor stands next to "Cloister Redoubt or Cloistered Doubt" sculpture part of the "Liberty" installation by artist Martin Puryear, at the United States' pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019.(AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
A man looks the
A man looks the "Aso Oke" sculpture part of "Liberty" installation by artist Martin Puryear, at the United States' pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019.(AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
A man looks the
A man looks the "Tabernacle" sculpture part of "Liberty" installation by artist Martin Puryear, at the United States' pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019.(AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
United States curator Brooke Kamin Rapaport, left, poses for a picture at the
United States curator Brooke Kamin Rapaport, left, poses for a picture at the "Liberty" installation by artist Martin Puryear at the United States' pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
Visitors watch the
Visitors watch the "Field Hospital" installation by artist Aya Ben Ron on display at Israel's pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019.(AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
Israeli artist Aya Ben Ron stands by her
Israeli artist Aya Ben Ron stands by her "Field Hospital" installation during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
A man walks past an installation at the Madagascar pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
A man walks past an installation at the Madagascar pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
The wreck of the 'Barca Nostra' fishing boat, which sank in the Mediterranean Sea in 2015 with 700 migrants on board, is displayed at the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. The wreck is part of an artistic installation of Art, a project of artist Christoph Büchel. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
The wreck of the 'Barca Nostra' fishing boat, which sank in the Mediterranean Sea in 2015 with 700 migrants on board, is displayed at the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. The wreck is part of an artistic installation of Art, a project of artist Christoph Büchel. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
A woman walks past the wreck of the 'Barca Nostra' fishing boat, which sank in the Mediterranean Sea in 2015 with 700 migrants on board, is displayed at the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. The wreck is part of an artistic installation of Art, a project of artist Christoph Büchel. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
A woman walks past the wreck of the 'Barca Nostra' fishing boat, which sank in the Mediterranean Sea in 2015 with 700 migrants on board, is displayed at the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. The wreck is part of an artistic installation of Art, a project of artist Christoph Büchel. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
A man walks through the
A man walks through the "Fogscreen' installation by artist Jitish Kallat at the India pavilion during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
Ghana pavilion curator Nana Oforiatta Ayim smiles during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
Ghana pavilion curator Nana Oforiatta Ayim smiles during the 58th Biennale of Arts exhibition in Venice, Italy, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Political issues that excite newsprint, airwaves and social media, such as fake news, migration, poverty, global warming and armed conflict, are getting a very open airing at the 58th Venice Biennale contemporary art fair, which Saturday, May 11, and runs through Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
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