0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

This article is more than 3 year old.

US judge pauses deportations, grants a week's time to families, says report

Mini

The families had been separated in a broader crackdown on illegal immigration by US President Donald Trump's administration, sparking an international outcry.

US judge pauses deportations, grants a week's time to families, says report
A district court judge in the United States, approved the request from the American Civil Liberties Union, to grant a week’s time and asked the government to temporarily halt deportations of reunited families.
Parents at the US-Mexico border, who were separated from their children, now have a week’s time to make the difficult decision whether have their child remain in the US to pursue a possible right to stay permanently in the United States, or to be deported with their child, a CNN report said.
According to CNN, Dana Sabraw, the federal judge who granted the halt said, "That just shouldn't be happening. There's no reason that I can think of where that can result in unhinging the reunifications underway."
The families had been separated in a broader crackdown on illegal immigration by US President Donald Trump's administration, sparking an international outcry. The president ordered the practice stopped on June 20.
Lawyers representing the NGO said, their motion was due to persistent and increased “rumors” about the immediate deportation of families that were reunited. The defendants, however, have refused to deny such allegations.
The judge's order on Monday gave lawyers more time to "figure out what reunification is going to mean for our clients," said Reuters, quoting Beth Krause, a supervising lawyer at the New York-based Legal Aid Society's Immigrant Youth Project.
Some mothers may decide to turn down reunification if it meant their child could win asylum in the United States, even if they themselves are deported, she said.
To that end, the Legal Aid Society filed a related lawsuit on Monday seeking a court order requiring US immigration officials to give 48 hours’ notice of planned family reunifications, allowing parents a better chance to consult with lawyers in advance about asylum and other options.
(With inputs from Reuters)
next story