0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

politics | IST

Get Schooled: It is time to move beyond intent on national education policy, says Atishi Marlena

Mini

CNBC-TV18 spoke with Alok Kumar adviser at Niti Aayog, Yamini Aiyar president and chief executive at Centre for Policy Research, Ashish Dhawan founder of Central Square Foundation and Atishi Marlena from the Delhi government to discuss the draft National Education Policy 2019.

Reforms in education is on the minds of the governments across states and at the centre. We now have a draft National Education Policy 2019 which was drafted by a committee chaired by former Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) chief K Kasturirangan.
The draft policy proposes sweeping changes and calls for expanding the purview of right to education, proposes board-like examination after classes 3, 5 and 8, a system of trained teachers recruitment and a central education commission among others. Recommendations were sought till July 31 and the Ministry of Human Resource Development says over 77,000 feedback letters have been received.
CNBC-TV18 spoke with Alok Kumar adviser at Niti Aayog, Yamini Aiyar president and chief executive at Centre for Policy Research, Ashish Dhawan founder of Central Square Foundation and Atishi Marlena from the Delhi government to discuss the draft policy.
Kumar said: "Policy is merely an intent document. Translation of that intent document on to the ground will require much greater focus and much greater attention and much greater engagement than setting up this policy document. However it is a good beginning."
Aiyar said: "If the draft policy is a declaration of intent then it seems to me very clear that in the declaration of intent there is a clear recognition that emphasis has to be on what happens inside the schools and not just about getting children into school."
Dhawan said: "The great thing about the new draft education policy is that it calls out priority number one as foundational learning. Policy calls out very clearly class 1 to class 3 is absolutely paramount, resources need to go there and by 2025 we need universal attainment of foundational literacy. Is that possible?
"I think it is possible because if you look at several countries around the world, when they have sharply focused on these early grades they have been able to turn the needle very quickly on learning outcomes."
Marlena said: "I would agree that the intent is in place. However, the bigger challenge that we face is not of intent. On the one hand, you have the idea of intent of improving school education which has always been there and you have the actual political socio-economic reality of government schools.
"It is time that we now have to move beyond the intent and lay out a very clear framework as to where are the resources going to come from? Who is going to put in the money? How much money is the central government going to put? Are we going to have a commitment from the central government that at least 6 percent of the GDP goes into education? Are we going to have commitments from the state governments as to what percentage of the their budget goes in because until one puts ones money where ones mouth is, all of this can just remain nice policy documents with very little impact on the ground."