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Politics

Bolivia military says won't 'confront' the people as pressure on Morales builds

Updated : 2019-11-10 14:59:20

President Evo Morales faced rising pressure to resolve a weeks-long standoff over Bolivia's disputed election on Saturday after police forces were seen joining anti-government protests and the military said it would not "confront the people" over the issue. Morales, Latin America's longest-standing leader, won an election on October 20, but a delay of nearly a day in the vote count sparked allegations of fraud and led to protests, strikes and road blocks.

People shout slogans during a protest against Bolivia's President Evo Morales in La Paz, Bolivia. President Evo Morales faced rising pressure to resolve a weeks-long standoff over Bolivia's disputed election on Saturday after police forces were seen joining anti-government protests and the military said it would not
People shout slogans during a protest against Bolivia's President Evo Morales in La Paz, Bolivia. President Evo Morales faced rising pressure to resolve a weeks-long standoff over Bolivia's disputed election on Saturday after police forces were seen joining anti-government protests and the military said it would not "confront the people" over the issue. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
An officer places a national flag in a police station during a protest against Bolivia's President Evo Morales in La Paz, Bolivia. Morales, Latin America's longest-standing leader, won an election on October 20, but a delay of nearly a day in the vote count sparked allegations of fraud and led to protests, strikes and roadblocks. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
An officer places a national flag in a police station during a protest against Bolivia's President Evo Morales in La Paz, Bolivia. Morales, Latin America's longest-standing leader, won an election on October 20, but a delay of nearly a day in the vote count sparked allegations of fraud and led to protests, strikes and roadblocks. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
People shout slogans during a protest against Bolivia's President Evo Morales outside the police station in La Paz, Bolivia. On Friday night and Saturday, local television showed and Reuters reporters witnessed police in several Bolivian cities marching alongside protesters in apparent acts of disobedience and joining chants regularly used by the opposition.  REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
People shout slogans during a protest against Bolivia's President Evo Morales outside the police station in La Paz, Bolivia. On Friday night and Saturday, local television showed and Reuters reporters witnessed police in several Bolivian cities marching alongside protesters in apparent acts of disobedience and joining chants regularly used by the opposition.  REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Police officers stand guard inside the police station in La Paz, Bolivia. Morales' government decried a
Police officers stand guard inside the police station in La Paz, Bolivia. Morales' government decried a "coup" against him by what it called "violent groups," prompting a number of fellow leftist leaders in the region to rally around him and call for a peaceful resolution to the crisis. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Police officers hang Bolivian flags at an entrance to the Police Operations Tactical Unit headquarters in La Paz, Bolivia. Adding to the pressure on Morales, the Armed Forces said in a statement on Saturday
Police officers hang Bolivian flags at an entrance to the Police Operations Tactical Unit headquarters in La Paz, Bolivia. Adding to the pressure on Morales, the Armed Forces said in a statement on Saturday "that we will never confront the people to whom we have a duty and we will always ensure peace, coexistence and the development of our homeland." REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez
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