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These are the world's biggest companies by revenue

Updated : July 19, 2018 06:37 PM IST

Walmart keeps the top spot for the fifth consecutive year in FORTUNE's annual Global 500 list, ranking the world's largest corporations by revenue:

1. Walmart Inc (US): Revenue: $500.34 billion. Walmart has been pruning the less productive parts of its business, such as selling its Asda business in Britain and closing 63 Sam’s Club locations in the US, the better focus on areas of growth. Its Walmart business in the US is transforming its website into an online mall offering a slew of brands and expanding its grocery delivery, while the shuttered Sam’s Clubs will be repurposed as e-commerce distribution centers to speed up delivery. Meanwhile, Walmart is making big moves in both China and India, looking to rev up international growth again. Image Source: Reuters
1. Walmart Inc (US): Revenue: $500.34 billion. Walmart has been pruning the less productive parts of its business, such as selling its Asda business in Britain and closing 63 Sam’s Club locations in the US, the better focus on areas of growth. Its Walmart business in the US is transforming its website into an online mall offering a slew of brands and expanding its grocery delivery, while the shuttered Sam’s Clubs will be repurposed as e-commerce distribution centers to speed up delivery. Meanwhile, Walmart is making big moves in both China and India, looking to rev up international growth again. Image Source: Reuters
2. State Grid Corporation (China): Revenue: $348.90 billion. China’s state-owned power company supplies power to 1.1 billion people, covering 88% of the most populous nation’s terrain, and boasts the annual revenues—$348.9 billion in 2017—to reflect the colossal nature of those operations. The world’s largest utility also owns and operates a growing portfolio of assets around the world, from Australia to Italy to Brazil, an expansion project that has increasingly drawn the attention of foreign regulators. Australia rejected a State Grid bid in recent years in the name of national security. State Grid has also aggressively been pursuing clean energy investment. Image Source: Reuters
2. State Grid Corporation (China): Revenue: $348.90 billion. China’s state-owned power company supplies power to 1.1 billion people, covering 88% of the most populous nation’s terrain, and boasts the annual revenues—$348.9 billion in 2017—to reflect the colossal nature of those operations. The world’s largest utility also owns and operates a growing portfolio of assets around the world, from Australia to Italy to Brazil, an expansion project that has increasingly drawn the attention of foreign regulators. Australia rejected a State Grid bid in recent years in the name of national security. State Grid has also aggressively been pursuing clean energy investment. Image Source: Reuters
3. Sinopec Group (China): Revenue: $326.95 billion. The state-owned Chinese oil and gas company formally known as China Petroleum and Chemical, Sinopec become the third largest company in the world by sales by riding its home country’s explosive growth and being savvy about pursuing its international ambitions. Last year it bought some of Chevron’s businesses in Africa for $900 million, helping it diversify its holdings. But that can run both ways, and now Sinopec has to navigate tense trade relations between the US and China. In mid-2018, the company said it would double its imports of US oil. Image Source: Reuters
3. Sinopec Group (China): Revenue: $326.95 billion. The state-owned Chinese oil and gas company formally known as China Petroleum and Chemical, Sinopec become the third largest company in the world by sales by riding its home country’s explosive growth and being savvy about pursuing its international ambitions. Last year it bought some of Chevron’s businesses in Africa for $900 million, helping it diversify its holdings. But that can run both ways, and now Sinopec has to navigate tense trade relations between the US and China. In mid-2018, the company said it would double its imports of US oil. Image Source: Reuters
4. China Natural Petroleum (China): Revenue: $326 billion. China’s largest energy company, China National Petroleum, explores, refines and sells crude oil and natural gas, in addition to manufacturing equipment and offering oil field services. That, coupled with international diversification in recent years, has propelled the behemoth to the No. 4 rank among companies worldwide. At the same time, the company is facing pressure from stricter environmental standards in many markets, as well as tense trade relations between the US and China. Image Source: Reuters
4. China Natural Petroleum (China): Revenue: $326 billion. China’s largest energy company, China National Petroleum, explores, refines and sells crude oil and natural gas, in addition to manufacturing equipment and offering oil field services. That, coupled with international diversification in recent years, has propelled the behemoth to the No. 4 rank among companies worldwide. At the same time, the company is facing pressure from stricter environmental standards in many markets, as well as tense trade relations between the US and China. Image Source: Reuters
5. Royal Dutch Shell Plc (Netherlands): Revenue: $311.87 billion. Rising oil and gas prices and output boosted Shell’s revenues by 30% and its profits nearly three-fold in 2017. The Anglo-Dutch oil major is nearing completion of a portfolio-simplifying, $30 billion divestment program and continues to grapple with its place in the global movement towards a cleaner, lower-carbon energy landscape. While the firm has upped investment in renewables and CEO Ben van Beurden, speaking to investors earlier this year, proclaimed Shell an “energy transition company,” 90% of Shell’s capital expenditure goes towards oil and gas and some shareholders are pressuring the company to diversify faster. Image Source: Reuters
5. Royal Dutch Shell Plc (Netherlands): Revenue: $311.87 billion. Rising oil and gas prices and output boosted Shell’s revenues by 30% and its profits nearly three-fold in 2017. The Anglo-Dutch oil major is nearing completion of a portfolio-simplifying, $30 billion divestment program and continues to grapple with its place in the global movement towards a cleaner, lower-carbon energy landscape. While the firm has upped investment in renewables and CEO Ben van Beurden, speaking to investors earlier this year, proclaimed Shell an “energy transition company,” 90% of Shell’s capital expenditure goes towards oil and gas and some shareholders are pressuring the company to diversify faster. Image Source: Reuters
6. Toyota Motor (Japan): Revenue: $265.17 billion. Toyota is the king of Japan’s auto industry. Known for big–selling cars like the Camry and Prius, the company is also preparing for the future by heavily investing in emerging technologies. The auto giant recently plunked $1 billion into fast-growing Asia-based ride-hailing company Grab while also spending $2.8 billion alongside several auto parts suppliers to found a new company that is focused on self-driving cars. Like other automakers, Toyota hopes its new products will eventually offset declining car sales in large markets like North America. Image Source: Reuters
6. Toyota Motor (Japan): Revenue: $265.17 billion. Toyota is the king of Japan’s auto industry. Known for big–selling cars like the Camry and Prius, the company is also preparing for the future by heavily investing in emerging technologies. The auto giant recently plunked $1 billion into fast-growing Asia-based ride-hailing company Grab while also spending $2.8 billion alongside several auto parts suppliers to found a new company that is focused on self-driving cars. Like other automakers, Toyota hopes its new products will eventually offset declining car sales in large markets like North America. Image Source: Reuters
7. Volkswagen (Germany): Revenue: $260.02 billion. Despite continued fallout from its “Dieselgate” emissions testing scandal, Volkswagen remains one of the world’s biggest automakers. And like many of its rivals, the company is pushing into new areas including self-driving and electric cars. It has also partnered with longtime rivals like Ford and Toyota subsidiary Hino Motors to develop commercial vehicles such as trucks and delivery vans. Image Source: Reuters
7. Volkswagen (Germany): Revenue: $260.02 billion. Despite continued fallout from its “Dieselgate” emissions testing scandal, Volkswagen remains one of the world’s biggest automakers. And like many of its rivals, the company is pushing into new areas including self-driving and electric cars. It has also partnered with longtime rivals like Ford and Toyota subsidiary Hino Motors to develop commercial vehicles such as trucks and delivery vans. Image Source: Reuters
8. BP Plc (Britain): Revenue: $244.58 billion. The UK-based energy supermajor jumped four spots—and edged ahead of rival Exxon Mobil—on this year’s list, thanks to the company’s rising production levels and the recovery in oil prices. Revenues increased 30% and profits soared from $115 million to $3.4 billion, making it a banner year for a company that, eight years later, continues to deal with the fallout from its Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The company also enjoyed its most successful year of exploration since 2004, and continues to diversify through investment in renewables. Image Source: Reuters
8. BP Plc (Britain): Revenue: $244.58 billion. The UK-based energy supermajor jumped four spots—and edged ahead of rival Exxon Mobil—on this year’s list, thanks to the company’s rising production levels and the recovery in oil prices. Revenues increased 30% and profits soared from $115 million to $3.4 billion, making it a banner year for a company that, eight years later, continues to deal with the fallout from its Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The company also enjoyed its most successful year of exploration since 2004, and continues to diversify through investment in renewables. Image Source: Reuters
9. Exxon Mobil (US): Revenue: $244.36 billion. Oil giant Exxon Mobil is enjoying the same momentum as the rest of the energy sector, posting a 151% year-over-year earnings gain on 2017 revenues of $244 billion. The company closed out the year with a tax reform boost that resulted in a $8.38 billion quarterly profit. Although rising gas prices promise another strong year, Exxon has so far not been growing as fast as others in the sector, which some attribute to a lack of capital investment during the downturn. Image Source: Reuters
9. Exxon Mobil (US): Revenue: $244.36 billion. Oil giant Exxon Mobil is enjoying the same momentum as the rest of the energy sector, posting a 151% year-over-year earnings gain on 2017 revenues of $244 billion. The company closed out the year with a tax reform boost that resulted in a $8.38 billion quarterly profit. Although rising gas prices promise another strong year, Exxon has so far not been growing as fast as others in the sector, which some attribute to a lack of capital investment during the downturn. Image Source: Reuters
10. Berkshire Hathaway (US): Revenue: $242.13 billion. Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway—whose many subsidiaries include Geico and the railroad Burlington Northern—struggled to grow through acquisitions in 2017, losing out on its bid for Oncor when it refused to raise its offer. Still, the Oracle of Omaha’s investment portfolio beat the S&P 500, as Buffett traded in underperforming stocks like IBM for winners including Apple, now Berkshire’s largest holding. And while the heavy hurricane season was tough on Berkshire’s reinsurance business, it more than made up for the losses by selling a world-record-setting policy to AIG for $10.2 billion. Image Source: Reuters
10. Berkshire Hathaway (US): Revenue: $242.13 billion. Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway—whose many subsidiaries include Geico and the railroad Burlington Northern—struggled to grow through acquisitions in 2017, losing out on its bid for Oncor when it refused to raise its offer. Still, the Oracle of Omaha’s investment portfolio beat the S&P 500, as Buffett traded in underperforming stocks like IBM for winners including Apple, now Berkshire’s largest holding. And while the heavy hurricane season was tough on Berkshire’s reinsurance business, it more than made up for the losses by selling a world-record-setting policy to AIG for $10.2 billion. Image Source: Reuters
Published : July 19, 2018 06:37 PM IST
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