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Supreme Court decriminalises Section 377

Updated : September 06, 2018 03:00 PM IST

In a historic move for the LGBTQ (Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Queer) community in India, the Supreme Court on Thursday legalised gay sex, lifting the ban on homosexuality.

Dipak Misra, the Chief Justice of India, while announcing the first judgement said that the LGBTQ community has the same fundamental right as others and the identity of an individual is very important.

Image Source: IANS

Supporters and members of the LGBT community celebrate outside the country's top court after it struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison, in New Delhi, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. The court gave its ruling Thursday on a petition filed by five people who challenged the law, saying they are living in fear of being harassed and prosecuted by police. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
Supporters and members of the LGBT community celebrate outside the country's top court after it struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison, in New Delhi, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. The court gave its ruling Thursday on a petition filed by five people who challenged the law, saying they are living in fear of being harassed and prosecuted by police. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
Supporters and members of the LGBT community celebrate after the country's top court struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison, in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. The court gave its ruling Thursday on a petition filed by five people who challenged the law, saying they are living in fear of being harassed and prosecuted by police. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
Supporters and members of the LGBT community celebrate after the country's top court struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison, in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. The court gave its ruling Thursday on a petition filed by five people who challenged the law, saying they are living in fear of being harassed and prosecuted by police. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
Supporters and members of the LGBT community celebrate after the country's top court struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison, in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. The court gave its ruling Thursday on a petition filed by five people who challenged the law, saying they are living in fear of being harassed and prosecuted by police. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
Supporters and members of the LGBT community celebrate after the country's top court struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison, in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. The court gave its ruling Thursday on a petition filed by five people who challenged the law, saying they are living in fear of being harassed and prosecuted by police. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
People belonging to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community celebrate after the Supreme Court's verdict of decriminalizing gay sex and revocation of the Section 377 law, at an NGO in Mumbai, India, September 6, 2018. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas
People belonging to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community celebrate after the Supreme Court's verdict of decriminalizing gay sex and revocation of the Section 377 law, at an NGO in Mumbai, India, September 6, 2018. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas
People belonging to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community celebrate after the Supreme Court's verdict of decriminalizing gay sex and revocation of the Section 377 law, at an NGO in Mumbai, India, September 6, 2018. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas
People belonging to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community celebrate after the Supreme Court's verdict of decriminalizing gay sex and revocation of the Section 377 law, at an NGO in Mumbai, India, September 6, 2018. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas
An activist wears a badge protesting against Section 377 of the India Penal Code (IPC) which criminalizes homosexuality, in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. India's top court has struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
An activist wears a badge protesting against Section 377 of the India Penal Code (IPC) which criminalizes homosexuality, in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. India's top court has struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
Badges protesting against Section 377 of the India Penal Code (IPC), which criminalizes homosexuality, lie on a table in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. India's top court has struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
Badges protesting against Section 377 of the India Penal Code (IPC), which criminalizes homosexuality, lie on a table in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. India's top court has struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
Indians celebrate after the country's top court struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison, in New Delhi, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. The court gave its ruling Thursday on a petition filed by five people who challenged the law, saying they are living in fear of being harassed and prosecuted by police. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
Indians celebrate after the country's top court struck down a colonial-era law that makes homosexual acts punishable by up to 10 years in prison, in New Delhi, India, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. The court gave its ruling Thursday on a petition filed by five people who challenged the law, saying they are living in fear of being harassed and prosecuted by police. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
Anwesh Pokkuluri, Romel Barel and Krishna Reddy M, petitioners challenging Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code that criminalises homosexuality, pose outside the premises of the Supreme Court in New Delhi, July 10, 2018. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi/Files
Anwesh Pokkuluri, Romel Barel and Krishna Reddy M, petitioners challenging Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code that criminalises homosexuality, pose outside the premises of the Supreme Court in New Delhi, July 10, 2018. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi/Files
Badges against the Section 377 law of the Indian Penal Code are pictured on a table at the entrance of an NGO, in Mumbai, India, September 6, 2018. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas
Badges against the Section 377 law of the Indian Penal Code are pictured on a table at the entrance of an NGO, in Mumbai, India, September 6, 2018. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas
People belonging to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community celebrate after the Supreme Court's verdict of decriminalizing gay sex and revocation of the Section 377 law, at an NGO in Mumbai, India, September 6, 2018. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas
People belonging to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community celebrate after the Supreme Court's verdict of decriminalizing gay sex and revocation of the Section 377 law, at an NGO in Mumbai, India, September 6, 2018. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas
Published : September 06, 2018 08:35 AM IST
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