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Death or glory: The tale of the dangerous climb to conquer Everest

Death or glory: The tale of the dangerous climb to conquer Everest

Death or glory: The tale of the dangerous climb to conquer Everest
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By AP May 29, 2019 2:42:28 PM IST (Updated)

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SUMMARY

Seasoned mountaineers say the Nepal government’s failure to limit the number of climbers on Mount Everest has resulted in dangerous overcrowding and a greater number of deaths.

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Birds fly as Mount Everest is seen from Namche Bajar, Solukhumbu district, Nepal. Seasoned mountaineers say the Nepal government’s failure to limit the number of climbers on Mount Everest has resulted in dangerous overcrowding and a greater number of deaths. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

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Selfie photo provided by Mark Kulish shows his brother Christopher Kulish beneath Mount Everest. Christopher Kulish, a Colorado climber, died shortly after getting to the top of Mount Everest and achieving his dream of scaling the highest peaks on each of the seven continents, his brother said Monday. (Christopher Kulish/Mark Kulish via AP)

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A long queue of mountain climbers line a path on Mount Everest. About half a dozen climbers died on Everest last week most while descending from the congested summit during only a few windows of good weather each May. (Nirmal Purja/@Nimsdai Project Possible via AP)

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Indian climber Ameesha Chauhan who survived dangerous overcrowding on Mount Everest gets treatment at a hospital after she was rescued in Kathmandu, Nepal. This year the government issued a record number of permits, leading to traffic jams on the world's highest peak that likely contributed to the greatest death toll in four years. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

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As the allure of Everest grows, so have the crowds, with inexperienced climbers faltering on the narrow passageway to the peak and causing deadly delays, veteran climbers said. Nepal, one of the world's poorest countries, relies on the climbing industry to bring in $300 million each year. It doesn't cap the number of permits it issues or controls the pace or timing of the expeditions, leaving that to tour operators and guides. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

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Even after 11 people died this year, Nepal tourism officials have no intention of restricting the number of permits issued, instead encouraging even more tourists and climbers to come "for both pleasure and fame," said Mohan Krishna Sapkota, secretary at the Ministry of Tourism and Civil Aviation. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

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Eric Murphy, a mountain guide from Bellingham, Washington poses for a photograph in Kathmandu. “Every minute counts there,” said Murphy, who climbed Everest for a third time on May 23. He said what should have taken 12 hours took 17 hours because of struggling climbers who were clearly exhausted but had no one to guide or help them.  (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

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