Motilal Oswal
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Motilal Oswal
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10 things you need to know before the opening bell on June 28

Updated : 2019-06-28 07:40:45

Indian shares are likely to open higher on Friday in line with gains in global markets as world leaders meet at the G20 meeting in Osaka, Japan. Asia shares inched higher on hopes a meeting between US President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping could ease trade tensions. At 7.23 AM, the SGX Nifty futures traded 26 points, or 0.22 percent, higher at 11,918, pointing to a positive start for the Sensex and the Nifty 50.

1. Asia: Share markets in Asia edged higher early on Friday morning as investors clung on to hopes that a highly anticipated meeting between US President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping this weekend could lead to an easing of trade tensions. Japan's Nikkei slipped 0.31 percent and Shanghai was down 0.14 percent while Kospi of South Korea was up 0.05 percent. (Image: Reuters)
1. Asia: Share markets in Asia edged higher early on Friday morning as investors clung on to hopes that a highly anticipated meeting between US President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping this weekend could lead to an easing of trade tensions. Japan's Nikkei slipped 0.31 percent and Shanghai was down 0.14 percent while Kospi of South Korea was up 0.05 percent. (Image: Reuters)
2. US: The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq closed higher in a broad-based rally on Thursday as investors looked to the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan this weekend for progress in the long-running U.S.-China trade dispute, which has whipsawed markets for months.The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 10.24 points, or 0.04 percent, to 26,526.58, the S&P 500 gained 11.14 points, or 0.38 percent, to 2,924.92 and the Nasdaq Composite added 57.79 points, or 0.73 percent, to close at 7,967.76. (Image: Reuters)
2. US: The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq closed higher in a broad-based rally on Thursday as investors looked to the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan this weekend for progress in the long-running U.S.-China trade dispute, which has whipsawed markets for months.The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 10.24 points, or 0.04 percent, to 26,526.58, the S&P 500 gained 11.14 points, or 0.38 percent, to 2,924.92 and the Nasdaq Composite added 57.79 points, or 0.73 percent, to close at 7,967.76. (Image: Reuters)
3. Markets At Close On Thursday: Indian benchmark indices ended the June F&O expiry flat on Thursday as gains in auto and realty sectors were capped by losses in IT and metal space. The sentiment was also dampened on renewed worries of a trade dispute with the United States after Trump called out India’s move to raise tariffs on US goods. At close, Sensex was down 5.67 points at 39,586.41, while Nifty was down 6 points at 11,841.55. Meanwhile, foreign institutional investors (FIIs) sold shares worth Rs 0.7 crore on a net basis in the cash market, while domestic institutional investors (DIIs) bought shares worth Rs 197 crore. (Image: Reuters)
3. Markets At Close On Thursday: Indian benchmark indices ended the June F&O expiry flat on Thursday as gains in auto and realty sectors were capped by losses in IT and metal space. The sentiment was also dampened on renewed worries of a trade dispute with the United States after Trump called out India’s move to raise tariffs on US goods. At close, Sensex was down 5.67 points at 39,586.41, while Nifty was down 6 points at 11,841.55. Meanwhile, foreign institutional investors (FIIs) sold shares worth Rs 0.7 crore on a net basis in the cash market, while domestic institutional investors (DIIs) bought shares worth Rs 197 crore. (Image: Reuters)
4. Crude Oil: Oil prices were steady on Friday, with the focus shifting to the G20 summit where a scheduled meeting between US President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping has stirred hopes that trade tensions could ease. Brent crude futures were up 5 cents, or 0.08 percent, at $66.60 per barrel by 0043 GMT. US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were down 2 cents, or 0.03 percent, at $59.41 a barrel.. (Image: Reuters)
4. Crude Oil: Oil prices were steady on Friday, with the focus shifting to the G20 summit where a scheduled meeting between US President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping has stirred hopes that trade tensions could ease. Brent crude futures were up 5 cents, or 0.08 percent, at $66.60 per barrel by 0043 GMT. US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were down 2 cents, or 0.03 percent, at $59.41 a barrel.. (Image: Reuters)
5. Currency: The rupee closed at Rs 69.06 against the US dollar, 0.13 percent lower on Thursday. The dollar index, which measures the U.S. currency against six of its peers, was at 96.195, down 0.3 percent on the week.. (Image: Reuters)
5. Currency: The rupee closed at Rs 69.06 against the US dollar, 0.13 percent lower on Thursday. The dollar index, which measures the U.S. currency against six of its peers, was at 96.195, down 0.3 percent on the week.. (Image: Reuters)
6. Reserve Bank of India: The country's financial system
6. Reserve Bank of India: The country's financial system "remains stable" despite recent setbacks and the NPA cycle has "turned around" with a sharp reduction in the ratio of dud assets to 9.3 percent, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) said Thursday in the Financial Stability Report. (Image: Reuters)
7. Spectrum Auctions: The proposed spectrum auctions in India, which includes radiowaves for 5G technology, are likely to be held only in the second half of 2020 or later, given the stressed balance sheets of telecom operators, Moody's Investors Service said.
7. Spectrum Auctions: The proposed spectrum auctions in India, which includes radiowaves for 5G technology, are likely to be held only in the second half of 2020 or later, given the stressed balance sheets of telecom operators, Moody's Investors Service said. "Regulators in countries such as India, Indonesia, and Bangladesh are still initiating consultations with operators and are likely to schedule 5G spectrum auctions only in second half of 2020 or later," Moody's Investors Service said in a report. (Image: Reuters)
8. Government On PSU Banks: The government does not think this is the right time to privatise the public sector banks but it is considering various options to bring down the government's holdings in PSBs to 51 percent, sources told <em>CNBC-TV18</em>. Valuations of the PSBs, role of bank unions and changes in Bank Nationalisation Act are among the various hurdles the government is facing on the road to privatisation, said sources. Further, the government also thinks financials of the PSBs don't support the move, they added. (Image: Reuters)
8. Government On PSU Banks: The government does not think this is the right time to privatise the public sector banks but it is considering various options to bring down the government's holdings in PSBs to 51 percent, sources told CNBC-TV18. Valuations of the PSBs, role of bank unions and changes in Bank Nationalisation Act are among the various hurdles the government is facing on the road to privatisation, said sources. Further, the government also thinks financials of the PSBs don't support the move, they added. (Image: Reuters)
9. RBI On NBFCs: The Reserve Bank on Thursday underlined the need for
9. RBI On NBFCs: The Reserve Bank on Thursday underlined the need for "greater surveillance" on large non-banking finance companies (NBFCs) and housing finance players (HFCs), saying the failure of the biggest among them can have the same impact as a big bank going down. (Image: Reuters)
10. SEBI On Mutual Funds: Following the liquidity crisis in some leading AMCs, regulator Sebi on Thursday made it mandatory for mutual funds selling liquid schemes to hold at least 20 percent in liquid assets like cash, g-secs, and also banned them from entering into standstill agreements with firms into whose debt they have exposure to. (Image: Reuters)
10. SEBI On Mutual Funds: Following the liquidity crisis in some leading AMCs, regulator Sebi on Thursday made it mandatory for mutual funds selling liquid schemes to hold at least 20 percent in liquid assets like cash, g-secs, and also banned them from entering into standstill agreements with firms into whose debt they have exposure to. (Image: Reuters)
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