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10 things you need to know before the opening bell on April 27

Updated : 2020-04-27 08:10:58

Indian shares are expected to rebound from the Friday lows as SGX Nifty traded over 50 points higher at 9,214, at 7:15 am on Monday. Rising oil prices and steady global markets this morning are the positive indicators for the Indian equity indices.

1. Asia: Stocks in Asia Pacific rose in morning trade on Monday, with the Bank of Japan due to kick off its monetary policy meeting. In Japan, the Nikkei 225 rose 0.91 percent while the Topix index also advanced 0.47 percent. The Japanese central bank begins its monetary policy meeting on Monday, as investors watch for policy moves from the central bank to grapple with the economic impact of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Over in South Korea, the Kospi added 0.31 percent. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 also edged fractionally higher. Overall, the MSCI Asia ex-Japan index traded 0.09 percent higher. (Image Source: AP)
1. Asia: Stocks in Asia Pacific rose in morning trade on Monday, with the Bank of Japan due to kick off its monetary policy meeting. In Japan, the Nikkei 225 rose 0.91 percent while the Topix index also advanced 0.47 percent. The Japanese central bank begins its monetary policy meeting on Monday, as investors watch for policy moves from the central bank to grapple with the economic impact of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Over in South Korea, the Kospi added 0.31 percent. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 also edged fractionally higher. Overall, the MSCI Asia ex-Japan index traded 0.09 percent higher. (Image Source: AP)
2. US: Stocks futures were largely flat on Sunday night, as oil prices fell, while investors assessed the possibility of re-opening the global economy after the coronavirus outbreak. Dow Jones Industrial Average futures were down 19 points, implying a Monday opening dip of around 28 points. S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures also pointed to a largely flat Monday open for the two indexes. Both the Dow and S&P 500 fell over 1 percent last week while the Nasdaq Composite dipped 0.2 percent. (Image Source: AP)
2. US: Stocks futures were largely flat on Sunday night, as oil prices fell, while investors assessed the possibility of re-opening the global economy after the coronavirus outbreak. Dow Jones Industrial Average futures were down 19 points, implying a Monday opening dip of around 28 points. S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures also pointed to a largely flat Monday open for the two indexes. Both the Dow and S&P 500 fell over 1 percent last week while the Nasdaq Composite dipped 0.2 percent. (Image Source: AP)
3. Market At Close On Friday: Indian shares fell over 1.5 percent on Friday, tracking weak global markets, as reports that an experimental drug to treat COVID 19 showed inconclusive results weighed on sentiment. The Sensex ended 536 points lower at 31,327, while the Nifty50 settled 159 points lower at 9,154. The decline was mainly led by banking, financial and IT stocks. However, gains in index heavyweight Reliance Industries capped some losses. (Image Source: Reuters)
3. Market At Close On Friday: Indian shares fell over 1.5 percent on Friday, tracking weak global markets, as reports that an experimental drug to treat COVID 19 showed inconclusive results weighed on sentiment. The Sensex ended 536 points lower at 31,327, while the Nifty50 settled 159 points lower at 9,154. The decline was mainly led by banking, financial and IT stocks. However, gains in index heavyweight Reliance Industries capped some losses. (Image Source: Reuters)
4. Rupee Close: Broad strength in the US dollar and weak domestic equity markets pushed Indian rupee lower. The rupee settled 39 paise lower at 76.46 per US dollar. (Image Source: Reuters)
4. Rupee Close: Broad strength in the US dollar and weak domestic equity markets pushed Indian rupee lower. The rupee settled 39 paise lower at 76.46 per US dollar. (Image Source: Reuters)
5. Crude Oil: Crude prices rose on Friday as energy producers continued to cut the number of rigs drilling for oil in the United States and Canada. U.S. oil settled 44 cents, or 2.67 percent, higher at $16.94 per barrel, after surging nearly 20 percent in the previous session. Brent crude traded 32 cents, or 1.5 percent, higher at $21.65. U.S. energy firms cut the most oil rigs in a month in April since 2015, according to energy services firm Baker Hughes Co . (Image Source: Reuters)
5. Crude Oil: Crude prices rose on Friday as energy producers continued to cut the number of rigs drilling for oil in the United States and Canada. U.S. oil settled 44 cents, or 2.67 percent, higher at $16.94 per barrel, after surging nearly 20 percent in the previous session. Brent crude traded 32 cents, or 1.5 percent, higher at $21.65. U.S. energy firms cut the most oil rigs in a month in April since 2015, according to energy services firm Baker Hughes Co . (Image Source: Reuters)
6. SAARC Countries Unveil Emergency Stimulus Packages: The SAARC countries have rolled out a raft of stimulus packages to boost investments, buffer private businesses and bolster growth in response to the COVID-19 pandemic that has upended life and disrupted economic activity in a region inhabited by over 1.8 billion people. The World Bank recently warned that South Asia faces its worst economic performance in 40 years due to the deadly coronavirus pandemic which has been wreaking havoc worldwide. It advised the governments to
6. SAARC Countries Unveil Emergency Stimulus Packages: The SAARC countries have rolled out a raft of stimulus packages to boost investments, buffer private businesses and bolster growth in response to the COVID-19 pandemic that has upended life and disrupted economic activity in a region inhabited by over 1.8 billion people. The World Bank recently warned that South Asia faces its worst economic performance in 40 years due to the deadly coronavirus pandemic which has been wreaking havoc worldwide. It advised the governments to "ramp up action to curb the health emergency, protect their people, especially the poorest and most vulnerable, and set the stage now for fast economic recovery". (Image Source: Reuters)
7. No Move On Reducing Retirement Age Of Government Employees: The government has categorically said that it would not reduce the retirement age of government employees nor was there any proposal discussed on the same, Union Minister of State (Independent Charge) Dr Jitendra Singh said. Strongly refuting media reports on a supposed proposal for reducing the retirement age of government employees to 50 years, Dr Singh categorically stated that there is no such move nor has there been any such proposal discussed or contemplated at any government level. (Image Source: Reuters)
7. No Move On Reducing Retirement Age Of Government Employees: The government has categorically said that it would not reduce the retirement age of government employees nor was there any proposal discussed on the same, Union Minister of State (Independent Charge) Dr Jitendra Singh said. Strongly refuting media reports on a supposed proposal for reducing the retirement age of government employees to 50 years, Dr Singh categorically stated that there is no such move nor has there been any such proposal discussed or contemplated at any government level. (Image Source: Reuters)
8. Mutual Funds Reach Out To RBI, SEBI: Mutual fund houses reached out to the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and market regulator Securities and Exchange Board of India over the weekend after concerns emerged over the closing down of Franklin Templeton's funds last week, sources told CNBC-TV18. However, there is no clarity on how and if the central bank will respond to them, the sources said. Franklin Templeton Mutual Fund on Thursday said it was closing down six credit funds due to liquidity issues amid the coronavirus crisis, leading to fears of redemptions among the market players. (Representational Image)
8. Mutual Funds Reach Out To RBI, SEBI: Mutual fund houses reached out to the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and market regulator Securities and Exchange Board of India over the weekend after concerns emerged over the closing down of Franklin Templeton's funds last week, sources told CNBC-TV18. However, there is no clarity on how and if the central bank will respond to them, the sources said. Franklin Templeton Mutual Fund on Thursday said it was closing down six credit funds due to liquidity issues amid the coronavirus crisis, leading to fears of redemptions among the market players. (Representational Image)
9. India's Holding Of US Government Securities Hits Record High: Continuing to increase its exposure, India's holding of US government securities jumped by over USD 13 billion in a month to record high of USD 177.5 billion at the end of February. In the last one year since February 2019, the overall holding of India has jumped by a staggering USD 33.2 billion. Latest data from the US Treasury Department showed that the amount of securities owned by India has also gone up by the maximum quantum in a span of one month, amid the country slowly hiking the level since November last year when it stood at USD 159.2 billion. (Image Source: Reuters)
9. India's Holding Of US Government Securities Hits Record High: Continuing to increase its exposure, India's holding of US government securities jumped by over USD 13 billion in a month to record high of USD 177.5 billion at the end of February. In the last one year since February 2019, the overall holding of India has jumped by a staggering USD 33.2 billion. Latest data from the US Treasury Department showed that the amount of securities owned by India has also gone up by the maximum quantum in a span of one month, amid the country slowly hiking the level since November last year when it stood at USD 159.2 billion. (Image Source: Reuters)
10. Government Plans To Fast Track Chinese Investments: India plans to fast track the review of some investment proposals from neigbouring countries such as China following concerns new screening rules could hit plans of companies and investors, three sources told Reuters on Saturday.
10. Government Plans To Fast Track Chinese Investments: India plans to fast track the review of some investment proposals from neigbouring countries such as China following concerns new screening rules could hit plans of companies and investors, three sources told Reuters on Saturday. "We will try to fast track investment proposals as soon as possible. It may be faster for some (sectors) and in others we might take some time," said the official, who did not want to be named due to the sensitivity of the discussions. Two other sources familiar with the government's thinking confirmed that a fast-track mechanism was being considered, with possible approval timelines of seven days to four weeks. (Image Source: Reuters)
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