• SENSEX
    NIFTY 50
Market

10 things you need to know before the opening bell

Updated : 2019-03-26 07:50:47

Indian shares are set to open little changed on Tuesday, taking cues from Asian peers, as US Treasury yields sank to their lowest since late 2017, adding to fears of a US recession. At 07:25 AM, the SGX Nifty, an early indicator of the Nifty 50's trend in India, was unchanged at 11,365, indicating a tepid start for the Sensex and Nifty.

1. Asia: MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was flat in early trade after two days of losses. Japan's Nikkei rebounded 1.1 percent after a 3.0 percent fall on Monday. (Image: Reuters)
1. Asia: MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was flat in early trade after two days of losses. Japan's Nikkei rebounded 1.1 percent after a 3.0 percent fall on Monday. (Image: Reuters)
2. US: The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 14.51 points, or 0.06 percent, to 25,516.83, the S&P 500 lost 2.35 points, or 0.08 percent, to 2,798.36 and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 5.13 points, or 0.07 percent, to 7,637.54. (Image: Reuters)
2. US: The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 14.51 points, or 0.06 percent, to 25,516.83, the S&P 500 lost 2.35 points, or 0.08 percent, to 2,798.36 and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 5.13 points, or 0.07 percent, to 7,637.54. (Image: Reuters)
3. Markets At Close On Monday: Indian shares ended lower for the third straight session on Monday, dragged down by weak global cues. The S&P BSE Sensex settled at 37,808, down 355 points, while the broader NSE Nifty50 ended at 11,354, falling 102 points. (Image: Reuters)
3. Markets At Close On Monday: Indian shares ended lower for the third straight session on Monday, dragged down by weak global cues. The S&P BSE Sensex settled at 37,808, down 355 points, while the broader NSE Nifty50 ended at 11,354, falling 102 points. (Image: Reuters)
4. Crude Oil: Brent crude oil futures were at $67.46 per barrel at 0110 GMT, up 25 cents, or 0.4 percent, from their last close. US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) futures were at $59.31 per barrel, up 49 cents, or 0.8 percent, from their last settlement. (Image: Reuters)
4. Crude Oil: Brent crude oil futures were at $67.46 per barrel at 0110 GMT, up 25 cents, or 0.4 percent, from their last close. US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) futures were at $59.31 per barrel, up 49 cents, or 0.8 percent, from their last settlement. (Image: Reuters)
5. Rupee: The rupee closed at 68.93, up by 2 paise against the dollar on Monday. (Image: Reuters)
5. Rupee: The rupee closed at 68.93, up by 2 paise against the dollar on Monday. (Image: Reuters)
6. Dollar: The dollar was little changed at 110.04 yen, after having hit a 1 1/2-month low of 109.70 on Monday. (Image: Reuters)
6. Dollar: The dollar was little changed at 110.04 yen, after having hit a 1 1/2-month low of 109.70 on Monday. (Image: Reuters)
7. FIIs & DIIs: Foreign institutional investors (FIIs) bought shares worth Rs 150 crore on a net basis, while domestic institutional investors (DIIs) sold shares worth Rs 13 crore on March 25. (Image: Stock Image)
7. FIIs & DIIs: Foreign institutional investors (FIIs) bought shares worth Rs 150 crore on a net basis, while domestic institutional investors (DIIs) sold shares worth Rs 13 crore on March 25. (Image: Stock Image)
8. Brexit: British lawmakers wrested control of the parliamentary agenda from the government for a day in a highly unusual bid to find a way through the Brexit impasse after Prime Minister Theresa May's EU divorce deal was rejected again. Lawmakers will now vote on a range of Brexit options on Wednesday, giving parliament a chance to indicate whether it can agree on a deal with closer ties to Brussels - and then try to push the government in that direction. (Image: Reuters)
8. Brexit: British lawmakers wrested control of the parliamentary agenda from the government for a day in a highly unusual bid to find a way through the Brexit impasse after Prime Minister Theresa May's EU divorce deal was rejected again. Lawmakers will now vote on a range of Brexit options on Wednesday, giving parliament a chance to indicate whether it can agree on a deal with closer ties to Brussels - and then try to push the government in that direction. (Image: Reuters)
9. US Bond Market: Benchmark 10-year Treasury yields fell to their lowest levels since December 2017, while the yield curve between three-month bills and 10-year notes inverted further as investors continued to assess last week's dovish pivot by the Federal Reserve. The Fed flagged an expected slowdown in the economy last week and decided against raising interest rates this year. The yield curve inversion, if it holds, is seen by some as an indicator that a recession is likely in one to two years. Ten-year notes were last yielding about 2.4 percent. (Image: Reuters)
9. US Bond Market: Benchmark 10-year Treasury yields fell to their lowest levels since December 2017, while the yield curve between three-month bills and 10-year notes inverted further as investors continued to assess last week's dovish pivot by the Federal Reserve. The Fed flagged an expected slowdown in the economy last week and decided against raising interest rates this year. The yield curve inversion, if it holds, is seen by some as an indicator that a recession is likely in one to two years. Ten-year notes were last yielding about 2.4 percent. (Image: Reuters)
10. Inflation: Food inflation in the country is likely to go up to 2 percent in the fiscal year 2019-20 from the 0.7 percent estimated for FY19, a report said on Monday. It can be noted that the low food prices have been one of the prime factors which have aided the RBI to be more accommodatory in its rate-setting recently. In the report, foreign brokerage Goldman Sachs attributed the low food prices in the last few months to the prices of cereals and vegetables which have been low for some time. (Image: Reuters)
10. Inflation: Food inflation in the country is likely to go up to 2 percent in the fiscal year 2019-20 from the 0.7 percent estimated for FY19, a report said on Monday. It can be noted that the low food prices have been one of the prime factors which have aided the RBI to be more accommodatory in its rate-setting recently. In the report, foreign brokerage Goldman Sachs attributed the low food prices in the last few months to the prices of cereals and vegetables which have been low for some time. (Image: Reuters)
Live TV

Ask Our Experts CNBC TV18