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A week in review: Here are the top stories from this week

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A look back at some of our biggest and best stories from this week, which include exclusive interviews with Nobel Prize for economics winner Abhijit Banerjee and home minister Amit Shah. Here's a quick recap, in case you missed them.

A week in review: Here are the top stories from this week
A look back at some of our biggest and best stories from this week. In case you missed them, here's a recap:
The logout campaign which began in August 2019, saw a full-blown war in the food space. Thousands of restaurants delisted from these loyalty programs owing to unreasonable discounts & commissions sought by foodservice aggregators. Restaurants said that Zomato Gold, Infinity Dining and offers from other foodservice aggregators were hurting their business.
Union home minister Amit Shah in a chat with Network18 group editor-in-chief Rahul Joshi spoke on a wide range of topics — from Maharashtra and Haryana elections to the situation in Kashmir. He also clarified his stance on the recent Hindi controversy and shared his take on the economic slowdown faced by the country.
There has been a lot of hullaballoo on dwindling GST collections after the numbers dropped below Rs 1 lakh crore mark to Rs 91,916 crore for September. The September collection is believed to be the lowest in nineteen months. In this scenario, it is interesting to note how much one pays as a consumer on different goods and services for household products.
It has been six months since Jet Airways — once the largest airline in Indian skies — collapsed. The last six months have seen quite a few debates about capacity, fares, market share, slots and a lot more. While each airline has its version of the story and strategy, the fact has been that the fall of growth in passenger numbers has coincided with the fall of Jet Airways. The air traffic growth in the country has been lackluster since the fall of the airline.
The New Global Hunger Index, published this week, shows how hunger across the world has gone up since 2015, with 785 million then to 822 million in 2018. The two main contributors to this rise in hunger are climate change and conflict. It is expected in the years to come, climate change will directly lead to conflict with wars over water, and over grain. And, it is mostly those who do not substantially add to the carbon footprint who are most likely to suffer hunger.
Tork Motors, India's first indigenous e-bike startup, has received an endorsement in the form of an investment of a "token amount" by Ratan Tata, chairman emeritus of the Tata Group, industrialist and investor. Speaking exclusively to CNBC-TV18, Kapil Shelke, founder of Tork Motors, said that the token amount can range anywhere in the rather broad range of "10 lakh to 10 crore".
Share Khan, in its report, said that the correction in the broader markets has been quite severe in the last one year. The brokerage also said that in troubled times, it is the quality companies with reputed management, strong balance sheet and healthy growth trend that perform well. On the other hand, it is once again proven that chasing momentum stocks could be quite a risky proposition, the report added.
Revenue Secretary Ajay Bhushan Pandey on Tuesday said it's not fair to say that Goods and Services Tax (GST) is responsible for the current economic slowdown in the country. In an interview to CNBC-TV18, Pandey said, "GST has given good growth till two months back for both Centre and states that too at much lower rates and I am optimistic that it will continue to do so." According to Pandey, GST collections will pick up from next month (November).
Do you remember the prices of milk or petrol 10 or 15 years back? Do you remember how much you used to spend on shopping for clothes before? You can think about the amounts needed for these same purchases today. Just keeping money or investing it where the returns are lower than the rate of inflation will lower your purchasing power over a period of time.
The stock has risen 9 percent in the last one year and has been flat (down 0.2 percent) in 2019 despite the liquidity issues and slowdown in demand. The stock hit its 52-week high of Rs 3,443.90 on September 23, 2019, and 52-week low of Rs 2,302.00 on August 21, 2019. The current market capitalisation of the company stands at Rs 75,314 crore.
For investors in SIP, it is natural that the current weak returns will disappoint them. But if you have the ‘faith’ in place, this ‘emotional pain and uncertainty’ will have to be humbly accepted as the price to be paid for long-term returns. While there is no denying the anxiety of what-if-this-continues, the simple solution still remains in the magical two words – Wait longer.
As Jet Airways collapsed, Spicejet moved in with aggression to not just fill in the void but also to capture its lost market. The airline had significantly reduced its operations leading up to that fateful day in December 2014, when the airline had all but shut down until a spate of changes led to its revival. It took the airline two and half years to reach the size and scale of its former self.
India’s banking sector seems to be passing through a difficult stage. The non-performing assets (NPAs) as a percentage of gross advances stood 11. 6 percent, and this ratio for public sector banks (PSBs) is 14.6 percent. The PSBs account for 86 percent of the NPAs. The growth rate of aggregate deposits have plunged to 6 percent, and credit growth has slackened to 10 percent in the last 15 years.
Indian-origin economist Abhijit Banerjee is among the three professors to win the Nobel Prize for economics in 2019. Banerjee is a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He, along with his fellow MIT Professor Esther Duflo and Harvard Professor Michael Kremer, has been awarded the Nobel for their ‘experimental approach to alleviating global poverty’.