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legal | IST

Supreme Court gives 24-hour deadline to Centre, Delhi govt to prepare plan to control air pollution

Mini

The Supreme Court observed if the governments are taking all necessary measures, then why is there a rise in pollution levels. The court asked the Centre to respond on implementation of norms for industrial, vehicular pollution.

The Supreme Court on Thursday came down heavily on the Centre and Delhi government over the rising pollution levels in the national capital. The apex court has given a 24-hour deadline to both Centre and the city government to come up with a serious plan for the implementation of measures to control air pollution. The court warned the governments that if they fail to take measures to control pollution, then the court will pass an order.
The top court observed if the governments are taking all necessary measures, then why is there a rise in pollution levels in Delhi. The court asked the Centre to respond on implementation of norms for industrial, vehicular pollution. "We are serious about industrial and vehicular pollution. You cannot fire bullets from our shoulders, you have to take steps. Why are schools open?" Supreme Court asked the Delhi government
The court also told the Commission for Air Quality Management in NCR and adjoining areas that in an emergency situation they have to work in emergent ways. "We cannot enforce or infuse creativity in your bureaucracy, you have to come up with some steps," the court told Centre.
The top court will hear the case on December 3.
The air quality of the national capital deteriorated on Thursday and settled in the severe category with the AQI clocking at 419 at 8 am, even as the minimum temperature settled four notches above the season's average at 13.4 degrees Celsius. According to the Ministry of Earth Science's air quality monitor SAFAR', the air quality is likely to improve from Friday onwards due to better wind speed. From December 3 onwards, winds are expected to increase dispersing pollutants but the AQI is likely to remain in the 'very poor' category. Low mixing layer height is preventing efficient dispersion of pollutants, SAFAR said in its advisory.
With inputs from PTI