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This article is more than 1 month old.

‘Never lose hope’: Chopper crash survivor Group Captain Varun Singh in a letter to his school

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Group Captain Varun Singh is currently fighting for his life in a Bengaluru hospital after surviving the chopper crash which killed CDS General Bipin Rawat and 12 others. Singh had written the note after being awarded the Shaurya Chakra last August.

‘Never lose hope’: Chopper crash survivor Group Captain Varun Singh in a letter to his school
Group Captain Varun Singh, the lone survivor of the deadly chopper crash in the Nilgiris, had written a letter to his school in September thanking his “teachers, instructors and peers over the years.” Group Captain Singh is now battling severe injuries that he suffered in the same crash that killed Chief of Defence Staff (CDS) General Bipin Rawat, his wife Madhulika Rawat, and 11 other Army and Air Force personnel.
Group Captain Singh is currently being treated at the Command Hospital in Bengaluru, where he remains critical.
Group Captain Singh had written to his school to express his gratitude after being awarded the Shaurya Chakra in August.  "I credit this prestigious award to all those I have been associated with over the years in school, NDA and thereafter the Air Force, as I firmly believe that my actions that day were a result of the grooming and mentoring by my teachers. instructors and peers over the years," he wrote.
Group Captain Singh was awarded the Shaurya Chakra for gallantry and courage in averting a mid-air accident after his Tejas light combat aircraft had suffered a serious technical glitch while in flight.
The IAF officer added that he was not writing to his school to “blow his own trumpet or writing with a desire to seek a pat on the back” but so that he could share some of his thoughts “about my life which I feel may help and inspire children who might feel that they are meant to be only mediocre in this hyper-competitive world.”
Group Captain Singh had addressed the letter to the principal of the school, though he had expressed his desire that the contents of the letter be shared with the students of the Army Public School in Haryana’s Chandimandir Cantonment.
He told students that in today’s extremely competitive academic environment, not everyone could be scoring above 90 percent, but one’s grade in 12th class alone did not decide the entire trajectory of one’s life. “I was mediocre and today I have reached difficult milestones in my career,” he wrote.
“It is ok to be mediocre. Not everyone will excel at school and not everyone will be able to score in the 90s. If you do, it’s an amazing achievement and must be applauded. However, if you don’t, do not think that you are meant to be mediocre. You may be mediocre in school but it is by no means a measure of things to come in life,” he said.
He added that to find success in the world one must find what is their true calling and focus on that aspect instead. “Find your calling, it could be art, music, graphic design, literature etc. Whatever you work towards, be dedicated, do your best. Never go to bed thinking I could have put in more effort,” the IAF officer wrote.
“Never lose hope, never think that you cannot be good at what you want to be. It will not come easy, it will take effort, it will require sacrifice of time and comfort,” added the officer, who is Directing Staff at the Defence Services Staff College (DSSC) in Wellington.
 
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