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India, China disengage in Ladakh's Gogra after 12th round of military talks

India, China disengage in Ladakh's Gogra after 12th round of military talks
India and China have agreed for disengagement in Gogra friction point after the 12th round of military commander talks, the government said on August 6.
In a major breakthrough, all temporary structures and other allied infrastructure created in the eastern Ladakh area by both sides have been dismantled and mutually verified, the government said in a statement, adding that the landform in the area has been restored to pre-stand off period.
The Indian Army and China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) ceased forward deployments in the area on August 4 and August 5 The troops of both sides are now in their respective permanent bases.
“This agreement ensures that the LAC in this area will be strictly observed and respected by both sides, and that there is no unilateral change in status quo,” the government said.
With this, one more sensitive area of a face-off between the Indian and Chinese troops along the Line of Actual Control has been resolved. “Both sides have expressed commitment to take the talks forward and resolve the remaining issues along the LAC in the Western Sector,” the government’s statement said.
Gogra is the second friction point where disengagement has taken place after Pangong Tso in February.
During the 12th round of military talks with China on July 31, India had pressed for an early disengagement of troops and weapons in Hot Springs, Gogra and other remaining friction points in eastern Ladakh. The talks reportedly lasted for around nine hours.
The latest round of talks took place after a gap of more than three and a half months. The 11th round of military dialogue had taken place on April 9 at the Chushul border point on the Indian side of the LAC and it lasted for around 13 hours.
The 12th round of military talks took place over two weeks after External Affairs Minister S Jaishankar firmly conveyed to his Chinese counterpart Wang Yi that the prolongation of the existing situation in eastern Ladakh was visibly impacting the bilateral ties in a "negative manner".
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