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Delhi: Water level in Yamuna recedes, but still above 'warning' mark

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The water level in the Yamuna in Delhi receded slightly on Monday but was still above the warning mark of 204.5 metre, as widespread rains continued in the upper catchment areas of the river, officials said. The administration has been keeping a close watch on the situation as more rains are expected in the region in the next three to four days.

Delhi: Water level in Yamuna recedes, but still above 'warning' mark
The water level in the Yamuna in Delhi receded slightly on Monday but was still above the warning mark of 204.5 metre, as widespread rains continued in the upper catchment areas of the river, officials said. The administration has been keeping a close watch on the situation as more rains are expected in the region in the next three to four days.
The water level was recorded at 204.87 metre at the Old Railway Bridge at 3 pm. It was 205.30 metre at 8 pm on Sunday, according to the flood control room. Till Sunday morning, over 100 families living in the Yamuna floodplains had been moved to higher areas, an official said.
On Friday, the Delhi administration had sounded a flood alert and expedited efforts to evacuate people from vulnerable areas, as the river swelled to 205.59 metre, breaching the danger mark of 205.33 metre amid heavy rains in the upper catchment areas. With Haryana discharging more water into the river from the Hathnikund Barrage, the departments concerned in Delhi remain on high alert.
Boats have been deployed and families living in vulnerable areas temporarily moved into tents and shelter homes of the city government, according to an official of the Delhi Disaster Management Authority. A flood alert is declared when the Yamuna crosses the "warning mark" of 204.50 metre.
The Delhi flood control room reported a discharge rate of around 15,000 cusecs from the Hathnikund Barrage in Haryana's Yamunanagar district at 3 pm. Normally, the flow rate at the barrage is 352 cusec, but the discharge is increased after heavy rainfall in catchment areas.
It had peaked to 1.60 lakh cusecs on Tuesday, the highest this year so far. One cusec is equivalent to 28.32 litre per second. The water discharged from the barrage normally takes two-three days to reach the capital.
According to a Meteorological Department official, "moderate to heavy" rains are predicted in northwest India over the next few days, which is likely to increase water levels in the rivers flowing through the region. An orange alert for moderate rain has also been sounded in Delhi for Monday.