Homehealthcare News

    New Malaria vaccine by University of Oxford and Novavax shows 77 percent efficacy

    New Malaria vaccine by University of Oxford and Novavax shows 77 percent efficacy

    New Malaria vaccine by University of Oxford and Novavax shows 77 percent efficacy
    Profile image

    By CNBCTV18.com  IST (Published)

    Mini

    In what could be a major breakthrough against Malaria, a new vaccine has demonstrated a 77 percent efficacy in early trials on young children, thus becoming the first vaccine to achieve the target of at least 75 percent efficacy set by the World Health Organization (WHO).

    In what could be a major breakthrough against Malaria, a new vaccine has demonstrated a 77 percent efficacy in early trials on young children, thus becoming the first vaccine to achieve the target of at least 75 percent efficacy set by the World Health Organization (WHO).

    The vaccine is the result of a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of R21, a low-dose circumsporozoite protein-based vaccine, on 450 children between the ages of five and 17 months in Burkina Faso, a West African country, according to reports.

    The vaccine has shown a high-level efficacy over a period of a year. The results are published in the medical journal Lancet in a pre-print form that means the results are yet to be peer-reviewed.

    During the trial, the children were divided into three groups and administered either a low dosage or a high of the new vaccine R21 or a rabies vaccine. Three doses, at an interval of four weeks, were administered to each participant before the malaria season and the fourth dose a year later.

    The vaccine showed an efficacy of 77 percent against malaria among the group having been administered a high dosage of R21 and 71 percent among those given low dosage shots. As of now, RTS, S/AS01, considered the most effective anti-malaria vaccine has an efficacy rate standing at 55.8 percent among African children.

    Children under the age of five are the most vulnerable to malaria and they comprise nearly 67 percent of deaths due to malaria globally, according to a report from the WHO. The WHO's 2020 report on Malaria said that the disease claimed the lives of 4 lakh people and two-thirds of the deaths were estimated to be among children under the age of five.

    Malaria has taken a devastating toll on countries in the African region that accounts for an extremely high proportion of the global malaria burden. In 2019, the region accounted for 94 percent of global malaria cases and deaths.

    Check out our in-depth Market Coverage, Business News & get real-time Stock Market Updates on CNBC-TV18. Also, Watch our channels CNBC-TV18, CNBC Awaaz and CNBC Bajar Live on-the-go!
    arrow down

      Most Read

      Market Movers

      View All
      CompanyPriceChng%Chng