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This article is more than 2 month old.

US ‘heat dome’ heads south; record temperatures expected

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Las Vegas may hit all-time high of 47°C. Forecast grimmer for Death Valley.

US ‘heat dome’ heads south; record temperatures expected
The ‘heat dome’ weather event that caused record-breaking high temperate in Canada and the north-western US states is now steadily moving south east. As the heat dome moves over hotter areas, temperatures are expected to match existing records.
The US National Weather Service said Las Vegas in Nevada may reach temperatures of 46 degrees Celsius (115 degrees Fahrenheit) during the coming weekend. There is also a 43 percent chance that Las Vegas may even hit 47 degrees Celsius (117 degrees Fahrenheit), its record highest, on July 10, and a 34 percent chance of hitting the temperature on July 11.
Areas of the Death Valley, part of the desert in California which stands on the border with Nevada, are also expected to hit 53 degrees Celsius (129 degrees Fahrenheit) on July 11 and 12. The current highest verifiable record of temperature is 54 degrees Celsius (129.2 degrees Fahrenheit), which was measured in 2013 in Death Valley and again in 2016 in Kuwait. Other areas in California are also expected to reach temperatures upwards of 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit) over the course of the next three days.
The entire population around the Las Vegas region will be at "very high" risk from heat-related illness over the weekend due to brutal temperatures.
The authorities have set guidelines for individuals to keep themselves safe from the relentless heat, citing that lack of air conditioning might prove to be fatal in the coming days. “Hydration will be key this week and weekend. Outdoor activities are not recommended at any time of the day for areas within the Excessive Heat Warning, and should be restricted to the cooler parts of the day for areas in the Heat Advisory,” said the US National Weather Service.
A heat dome is a high-pressure system that creates and traps hot air in a self-sustaining cycle. It was because of the current heat dome that Canada recorded a large number of deaths and wildfires in the past few weeks. Events like the current heat dome are expected to increase in intensity and frequency as a result of rising global temperatures.