0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

environment | IST

Need to reduce methane emission by 40% in current decade to limit global warming: Energy Transitions Commission

Mini

According to Lord Adair Turner, Chair of Energy Transitions Commission International, many countries, since the Paris summit, are committed to net zero by 2050. India has NDCs which commit it to slowly decrease the rate of growth of emissions but it also has some specific objectives like 450 gigawatts of solar and wind energy in place by 2030..

With less than a month to go for the COP26 summit, where world leaders will come together to talk about climate change and carbon emissions, the Energy Transitions Commission has launched a report which talks about identifying a set of technically and economically feasible actions which can be implemented in the next decade.
Lord Adair Turner, Chair of Energy Transitions Commission International, in an interview with Sonal Bhutra, said the world needs to reduce methane emission by 40 percent "during the 2020s" to stand a high chance of limiting global warming below 2 degrees Centigrade.
“To have a high chance of limiting global warming below 2 degrees Centigrade, we need to reduce methane emissions not only to around zero by mid-century but by something like 40 percent during the 2020s. About 380 million tonnes of methane is emitted by human energy and agricultural system each year.”
He said India has nationally determined contributions (NDCs) which commit to slowly decrease the rate of growth of emissions.
“Many countries since the Paris summit have got commitments to get to net zero by 2050 and many of them are turning them into short-term actions required to get there. India has NDCs which commit it to slowly decrease the rate of growth of emissions but it also has some specific objectives such as 450 gigawatts of solar and wind energy in place by 2030. That is driving real decisions being made by authorities to hold auctions.”
Storing hydrogen and burning it in gas turbines when needed, rather than burning methane gas, is a long-term solution he said.
“The cost of renewables is getting cheaper and cheaper and we increasingly have a technological vision of how to deal with the storage problems in renewable electricity. The answer almost certainly in the long term is hydrogen. Storing hydrogen and burning it in gas turbines when it is needed, rather than burning methane gas.”
Watch video for more.