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This article is more than 5 month old.

After Greta Thunberg, who? Jude Walker from UK, all of 11 years. He walks the ‘zero carbon’ talk

Mini

The pre-teen has embarked on a 320-km walk from northern England to London to raise awareness about mission net zero. He doesn’t believe in half measures, and is going all out to petition the UK government for a nationwide full carbon tax. He has picked up 57,000 signatures so far.

After Greta Thunberg, who? Jude Walker from UK, all of 11 years. He walks the ‘zero carbon’ talk
Eleven-year-old Jude Walker is on an epic walk from northern England to London to raise awareness about the 'zero-carbon campaign.’ Hailing from Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire, he started his 320-km walk on July 25 and is currently covering 16 km a day to reach London by August 14.The campaign calls for a nationwide carbon tax and currently has close to 57,000 signatures. Walker wants people to sign the petition in huge numbers as 100,000 signatures can send the petition to the Parliament, where it will be eligible for a debate.
He said he was partly inspired by the work of fellow environmental activist Greta Thunberg, and thinks a nationwide carbon tax will be crucial to tackle climate change.
“We now know a lot more about climate change and I think a carbon tax would be definitely one of the most useful solutions to it,” Walker told Reuters in an interview as he walked through a town about 80 km from London.
He is accompanied by his family and friends. Sometimes he is also joined by politicians who have supported his initiative.
“The effects of climate change are already being seen, we really need to make the changes now, particularly if you want to avoid the devastating impacts later on,” said Walker.
It is no secret that scientists all around the world are sounding alarms to take immediate large-scale action to slow down the effects of climate change. The recent IPCC report further validated the need for governments to take immediate steps for combating global warming.
The British government in response to the petition claimed that it was the first major country to legislate for net zero emissions by 2050.
But Walker, in a separate interview with Sky News, said that the government "hasn't done enough for climate change in general, but also not for carbon tax because they seem to just be sticking with their Emissions Trading Scheme and Climate Change Levy.”
He added that he would prefer the carbon tax, “I would definitely prefer a full carbon tax, that's why we're doing this petition.”
His mother Sarah said that they are proud of him. When Walker first pitched the idea, they thought it was not possible, logistically. “We put up obstacles to doing it and he countered every single one of them,” she was quoted as saying in a News 18 report.
 
 
 
 
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