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This article is more than 2 year old.

How this 18-year-old Indian-American became the youngest junior partner ever at one global investment firm

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Bagaria recalls to CNBC that after getting motivated by his uncle about the financial stock markets, he sought out ways to learn and the first book that he read on investment was, ‘Investing for Dummies’ and took a financial literacy class in middle school.

How this 18-year-old Indian-American became the youngest junior partner ever at one global investment firm
An 18-year old from New Jersey is the youngest partner at an investment firm, Thessalus Capital. Rishi Bagaria, a high school student, started out early as an analyst at the investment firm that was founded by his older brother and family friends when he was just 15-year-old eighth grader.
Bagaria told CNBC that after getting motivated by his uncle about the stock markets, he sought out ways to learn and the first book that he read on investment was, ‘Investing for Dummies’ and took a financial literacy class in middle school.
With the help of his family, Rishi and his brother Raj Bagaria started investing in a virtual stock market account and treated the investment made as real. However, the first real investment ever done by Rishi Bagaria was when he bought “blue chip stock” like Apple and AT&T as he did not want to be too risky.
Rishi, currently the youngest partner as well as a member of the upper management at Thessalus Capital, decides on how to invest. He also leads a team of analysts and reviews their research and pitch decks before it gets presented to the upper management, CNBC said.
Bagaria makes time for his work at Thessalus Capital between school assignments, as well as on the weekends. (He also makes it a priority read The Wall Street Journal and The Economist every morning, a tradition he started in sixth grade.) Fall term senior year was the “most stressful” for Bagaria because he was also juggling college applications. He plans to attend Georgetown in the fall and study Global Business, CNBC added.
Bagaria shared his most profound learning experience while working with Thessalus’ when he had pitched a bad stock due to insufficient research and feeling “disappointment and shame.” The lesson taught Bagaria that the market is not going to be stable always and people are going to make mistakes, but it’s about knowing how to come back from it and mitigate and lessen the losses.
The Bagaria brothers and their family friends Mitchell and Kenneth Ng launched Thessalus Capital and started investing in healthcare companies as it was their area of expertise. The Ng brothers, both 24, are medical students and most of the investors and advisors are physicians or healthcare investors.
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