Homeentertainment News

Thank you, Alia Bhatt, Ranbir Kapoor for choosing your home as your wedding destination

This article is more than 2 month old.

Thank you, Alia Bhatt, Ranbir Kapoor for choosing your home as your wedding destination

Mini

No matter how private their life decisions or celebrations are, whatever stars do is still painfully public, lapped up by millions, creating ripples that have far-reaching effects. So thank you, Alia Bhatt, Ranbir Kapoor, and everyone before them for being audacious enough to celebrate your wedding the way you wanted and inviting who you wanted.

Thank you, Alia Bhatt, Ranbir Kapoor for choosing your home as your wedding destination
When I first told a friend that I want to get married at my home, he rolled his eyes at me before laughing off the idea. He thought it was too ridiculous to even discuss. This was eight years ago, a time when destination weddings were at their hottest among Indians eager to splurge all that they had amassed post-1991 economic reforms.
The algebra was simple. The more remote and exotic your wedding destination and the bigger the names you chose as your crew—for clothes, photographs, décor, and food—the better the chances that your big day would be remembered as dreamy and fairy-tale like.
Celebrity weddings in the last 20 years have only cemented the trend, to an extent that any deviation from it had begun to feel like blasphemy. You needed to think farther, fatter, and fancier than the last big wedding you saw on Instagram. Even though they did propagate it in a major (and what felt like an irreversible) way, it’d be unfair to blame just Anushka Sharma-Virat Kohli, Priyanka Chopra-Nick Jonas, or Deepika Padukone-Ranveer Singh. Even Raveena Tandon, who married film distributor Anil Thadani 18 years ago, did it with much aplomb at Udaipur’s majestic Shiv Niwas Palace with the gorgeous Jag Mandir in the backdrop.
Just when I thought that the next Bollywood power couple would get married on the moon, since all the other destinations are too done, too blasé, they stumped me. They got married on their home’s balcony instead. When Alia Bhatt posted the first pictures of her wedding ceremony on Instagram last week, announcing her much-anticipated union with long-time boyfriend Ranbir Kapoor, I couldn’t help but smile. Finally. Someone, somewhere who also didn’t think that getting married at home was outrageous. They did it despite such mammoth public expectations and scrutiny. And with such grace. Funnily, that friend, who had laughed at me eight years ago for cherishing such a mundane idea of getting married, is one of the 12.7 million people who’ve liked Bhatt’s Instagram post.
It’s not like Alia and Ranbir couldn’t afford to get married at the picturesque Lake Como or in front of the Eiffel Tower or in the sky on a hot air balloon over the jungles of Africa with the sun setting in the background, bleeding various shades of tangerine and blue. But they chose not to. Not just that, they didn’t even throw multiple receptions, or even one, creating a fissure in the new tradition that has, over the years, become the gold standard.
But it isn’t just Alia and Ranbir. Fifteen years ago, another pair of superstars got wed in a deeply private family gathering. Aishwarya Rai and Abhishek Bachchan chose his superstar father’s home Prateeksha to mark the beginning of their new life together. However, this consciousness, of choosing your home—where you have countless memories associated with every space and corner—over an unfamiliar venue far away to get married, is growing among celebrities.
Today, more actors are leading by example. Farhan Akhtar and Shibani Dandekar recently took their marital vows at Javed Akhtar’s farmhouse in Khandala in a low-key ceremony. So did Yami Gautam and Aditya Dhar last year. They tied the knot at her home estate in Himachal Pradesh amid just select friends and family.
Not just that, Yami wore her mother’s 33-year-old silk saree and did her own makeup on her wedding day. It was a deliberate act, she told Outlook. “It was an indirect way to put across that you don't have to spend lakhs of rupees to look your best on your special day. I am saying that look your best because it's a very special day in that regard. But you define your own look, you find your own version of what looks the best on you,” she said.
“I am very certain that I would have got married the same way, even if there was no pandemic. Of course, (as actors) we have the opportunity, facility, and luxury of having some of the best makeup artists with us. But despite being a public figure if I can, you can too. You don't have to spend your hard-earned money. I come from a middle-class family and I have middle-class values, so I understand that. Both Aditya and I value that," she added.
No matter how private their life decisions or celebrations are, whatever stars do is still painfully public, lapped up by millions, creating ripples that have far-reaching effects. So thank you, Alia, Ranbir, and everyone before them for being audacious enough to celebrate your wedding the way you wanted and inviting who you wanted.
The result? Today, when I discuss with my mother how I’d like to decorate our home for my nuptials, she doesn’t dismiss me or find it ludicrous. She participates actively. In fact, she has pinned several Pinterest images for reference. She always understood. For she, too, took her pheras in her native haveli’s aangan, under the moonlight, 32 years ago amid people she knew since she was a girl. But today, she doesn’t fear either. Societal judgment or anything else. Because she has validation. When she could, when Alia and Ranbir can, her daughter can too.
Read other articles by Sneha Bengani here
next story

Market Movers

Currency

CompanyPriceChng%Chng