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Scientists warn a million species at risk of extinction

Updated : May 06, 2019 03:33 PM IST

Relentless pursuit of economic growth, twinned with the impact of climate change, has put an "unprecedented" one million species at risk of extinction, scientists said on Monday in a landmark report on the damage done by modern civilisation to the natural world.Only a wide-ranging transformation of the global economic and financial system could pull ecosystems that are vital to the future of human communities worldwide back from the brink of collapse, concluded the report, which was endorsed by 130 countries, including the United States, Russia and China."The essential, interconnected web of life on Earth is getting smaller and increasingly frayed," said Professor Josef Settele, who co-chaired the study, launched in Paris on Monday by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES).

A view of a destroyed mangrove forest outside the Sunlight Seafood shrimp farm in Pitas, Sabah, Malaysia, July 6, 2018. REUTERS/Edgar Su/File Photo
A view of a destroyed mangrove forest outside the Sunlight Seafood shrimp farm in Pitas, Sabah, Malaysia, July 6, 2018. REUTERS/Edgar Su/File Photo
Greenpeace activists demonstrate outside the Palais des Congres after they disrupted Total's annual shareholders meeting in protest against the French oil and gas major's quest to the drill in the ecologically sensitive Amazon basin and French Guyana, in Paris, France, June 1, 2018. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer/File Photo
Greenpeace activists demonstrate outside the Palais des Congres after they disrupted Total's annual shareholders meeting in protest against the French oil and gas major's quest to the drill in the ecologically sensitive Amazon basin and French Guyana, in Paris, France, June 1, 2018. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer/File Photo
Sir Robert Watson, a British environmental scientist who chairs the IPBES (Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services), poses during an interview with Reuters ahead of the launch of a landmark report on the damage done by modern civilisation to the natural world at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, France, May 5, 2019. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
Sir Robert Watson, a British environmental scientist who chairs the IPBES (Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services), poses during an interview with Reuters ahead of the launch of a landmark report on the damage done by modern civilisation to the natural world at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, France, May 5, 2019. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
The Amazon rain forest (L), bordered by deforested land prepared for the planting of soybeans, is pictured in this aerial photo taken over Mato Grosso state in western Brazil, October 4, 2015. Picture taken October 4, 2015. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/File Photo
The Amazon rain forest (L), bordered by deforested land prepared for the planting of soybeans, is pictured in this aerial photo taken over Mato Grosso state in western Brazil, October 4, 2015. Picture taken October 4, 2015. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/File Photo
Sir Robert Watson, a British environmental scientist who chairs the IPBES (Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services), poses during an interview with Reuters ahead of the launch of a landmark report on the damage done by modern civilisation to the natural world at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, France, May 5, 2019. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
Sir Robert Watson, a British environmental scientist who chairs the IPBES (Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services), poses during an interview with Reuters ahead of the launch of a landmark report on the damage done by modern civilisation to the natural world at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, France, May 5, 2019. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
 A Ka'apor Indian warrior uses a chainsaw to ruin one of the logs they found during a jungle expedition to search for and expel loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory, near the Centro do Guilherme municipality in the northeast of Maranhao state in the Amazon basin, August 7, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho/File Photo
 A Ka'apor Indian warrior uses a chainsaw to ruin one of the logs they found during a jungle expedition to search for and expel loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory, near the Centro do Guilherme municipality in the northeast of Maranhao state in the Amazon basin, August 7, 2014. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho/File Photo
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