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Muslims worry about fate of relatives in China

Updated : 2019-10-14 15:33:43

The woman wipes at a tear as she talks about her daughter in China's Xinjiang region. Nurbakyt Kaliaskar, who lives in neighboring Kazakhstan, says her 25-year-old daughter is a college graduate who had a white-collar job. Then she got swept up in a Chinese crackdown on Muslims in Xinjiang. The Muslims are taken to internment camps for re-education and, in some cases, for vocational training before being forced to work in factories, according to an analysis of satellite images and the accounts of former detainees and relatives interviewed by The Associated Press.The government says the participants have signed agreements to be trained. Guard towers and barbed wire around the sprawling complexes that have sprung up in China's barren far west suggest the training isn't voluntary.

In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, residents line up inside the Artux City Vocational Skills Education Training Service Center at the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. Across the Xinjiang region, a growing number of internment camps have been built, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. Photo Credit-AP
In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, residents line up inside the Artux City Vocational Skills Education Training Service Center at the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. Across the Xinjiang region, a growing number of internment camps have been built, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. Photo Credit-AP
In this Dec. 6, 2018 photo, Nurbakyt Kaliaskar cries as she speaks about her daughter's detainment in a Chinese internment camp during an interview in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Kaliaskar, who lives in neighboring Kazakhstan, says her 25-year-old daughter is a college graduate who had a white-collar job. Then she got swept up in a Chinese crackdown on Muslims in Xinjiang. Photo Credit-AP
In this Dec. 6, 2018 photo, Nurbakyt Kaliaskar cries as she speaks about her daughter's detainment in a Chinese internment camp during an interview in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Kaliaskar, who lives in neighboring Kazakhstan, says her 25-year-old daughter is a college graduate who had a white-collar job. Then she got swept up in a Chinese crackdown on Muslims in Xinjiang. Photo Credit-AP
In this Dec. 8, 2018 photo, Mainur Medetbek holds up a portrait of her detained husband at her home in a village outside Almaty, Kazakhstan. Medetbek says her husband was detained over a year ago in an internment camp and was recently transferred to a factory, where he is required to live in dormitories six days a week. She says the ordeal has deprived her family of income and driven her to contemplate suicide many times. Photo Credit-AP
In this Dec. 8, 2018 photo, Mainur Medetbek holds up a portrait of her detained husband at her home in a village outside Almaty, Kazakhstan. Medetbek says her husband was detained over a year ago in an internment camp and was recently transferred to a factory, where he is required to live in dormitories six days a week. She says the ordeal has deprived her family of income and driven her to contemplate suicide many times. Photo Credit-AP
In this Dec. 7, 2018, photo, Sala Jimobai stands with her son, Aqzhol Dakey, holding a picture of her husband Dakey Zhunishan for a photo outside the office of an advocacy group for ethnic Kazakhs born in China in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Jimobai says her husband, a sheep herder, was detained in an internment camp in China's far western Xinjiang region, and later transferred to a factory in October for a month before being released. He is now confined to his brother's village in China. Photo Credit-AP
In this Dec. 7, 2018, photo, Sala Jimobai stands with her son, Aqzhol Dakey, holding a picture of her husband Dakey Zhunishan for a photo outside the office of an advocacy group for ethnic Kazakhs born in China in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Jimobai says her husband, a sheep herder, was detained in an internment camp in China's far western Xinjiang region, and later transferred to a factory in October for a month before being released. He is now confined to his brother's village in China. Photo Credit-AP
In this Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, photo, residents pass by the entrance to the
In this Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, photo, residents pass by the entrance to the "Hotan City apparel employment training base" where Hetian Taida has a factory in Hotan in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. Photo Credit-AP
In this Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, photo, two layers of barbed wire fencing ring the
In this Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, photo, two layers of barbed wire fencing ring the "Hotan City apparel employment training base" where Hetian Taida has a factory in Hotan in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. Photo Credit-AP
In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a guard tower and barbed wire fences are seen around a facility in the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released.Photo Credit-AP
In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a guard tower and barbed wire fences are seen around a facility in the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released.Photo Credit-AP
In this Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, photo, two layers of barbed wire fencing ring the
In this Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, photo, two layers of barbed wire fencing ring the "Hotan City apparel employment training base" where Hetian Taida has a factory in Hotan in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. Photo Credit-AP
In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a guard tower and barbed wire fences are seen around a facility in the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. Photo Credit-AP
In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a guard tower and barbed wire fences are seen around a facility in the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. Photo Credit-AP
Rushan Abbas, 51, of Herndon, Va., holds a photo of her sister, Gulshan Abbas, Monday, Dec. 17, 2018, in Washington. Rushan Abbas, a Uighur in Washington, D.C., said her sister is among the many Uighurs detained. The sister, Dr. Gulshan Abbas was taken to what the government calls a vocational center, although she has no specific information on whether her sister is being forced to work. Photo Credit-AP
Rushan Abbas, 51, of Herndon, Va., holds a photo of her sister, Gulshan Abbas, Monday, Dec. 17, 2018, in Washington. Rushan Abbas, a Uighur in Washington, D.C., said her sister is among the many Uighurs detained. The sister, Dr. Gulshan Abbas was taken to what the government calls a vocational center, although she has no specific information on whether her sister is being forced to work. Photo Credit-AP
In this Sep. 17, 2018, satellite image released by Planet Labs, buildings are seen around the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China’s Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. (Planet Labs via AP)
In this Sep. 17, 2018, satellite image released by Planet Labs, buildings are seen around the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China’s Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. (Planet Labs via AP)
In this Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a child stands near a large screen showing photos of Chinese President Xi Jinping near a carpark in Kashgar in western China's Xinjiang region. Across the Xinjiang region, a growing number of internment camps have been built, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. 
In this Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a child stands near a large screen showing photos of Chinese President Xi Jinping near a carpark in Kashgar in western China's Xinjiang region. Across the Xinjiang region, a growing number of internment camps have been built, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. 
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