Motilal Oswal
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Motilal Oswal
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Lives forever changed by Christchurch shootings

Updated : 2019-04-09 11:16:39

Several weeks after an attack on Muslim worshippers that killed fifty people and left dozens wounded, the lives of survivors and the families of victims have changed irrevocably. Some survivors feel emboldened, others are haunted by memories of the attack and haven't been able to return to the mosque.

Burying loved ones brought relief to many families, but reminders of their losses are never far away, from an empty seat at a dinner table to the prospect of Ramadan celebrations in a few weeks.

The shootings on March 15 shook New Zealand and prompted the government to tighten gun laws and launch a powerful national inquiry into the country's worst peacetime massacre. An Australian man, a suspected white supremacist, has been charged with 50 murders and 39 attempted murders.

A flower tribute is seen outside Al Noor mosque where more than 40 people were killed by a suspected white supremacist during Friday prayers on March 15, in Christchurch, New Zealand March 27, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
A flower tribute is seen outside Al Noor mosque where more than 40 people were killed by a suspected white supremacist during Friday prayers on March 15, in Christchurch, New Zealand March 27, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Mohammed Israfil Hossain, a muazzin from Bangladesh, shows an opening in the pulpit where a three-year-old boy hid during the shootings at Al Noor mosque where more than 40 people were killed by a suspected white supremacist during Friday prayers on March 15 in Christchurch, New Zealand April 1, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Mohammed Israfil Hossain, a muazzin from Bangladesh, shows an opening in the pulpit where a three-year-old boy hid during the shootings at Al Noor mosque where more than 40 people were killed by a suspected white supremacist during Friday prayers on March 15 in Christchurch, New Zealand April 1, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
A tribute to Haji-Daoud Nabi, originally from Afghanistan, who was killed in the Christchurch shootings, is hung outside his property in Christchurch, New Zealand March 31, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
A tribute to Haji-Daoud Nabi, originally from Afghanistan, who was killed in the Christchurch shootings, is hung outside his property in Christchurch, New Zealand March 31, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
A Quran verse that reads
A Quran verse that reads "Allah is with those who are patient", is reflected on a clock at Al Noor mosque where more than 40 people were killed by a suspected white supremacist during Friday prayers on March 15, in Christchurch, New Zealand April 1, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
A scrapbook belonging to the late Hussein Moustafa, an Egyptian immigrant who lost his life in the Christchurch shootings, is seen at his home in Christchurch, New Zealand March 30, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
A scrapbook belonging to the late Hussein Moustafa, an Egyptian immigrant who lost his life in the Christchurch shootings, is seen at his home in Christchurch, New Zealand March 30, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Armed police officers stand guard outside Al Noor mosque where more than 40 people were killed by a suspected white supremacist during Friday prayers on March 15, in Christchurch, New Zealand April 1, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Armed police officers stand guard outside Al Noor mosque where more than 40 people were killed by a suspected white supremacist during Friday prayers on March 15, in Christchurch, New Zealand April 1, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Mohammed Moustafa shows a watch that his late father 70-year-old Hussein Moustafa had worn during the Christchurch shootings, at their home in Christchurch, New Zealand March 30, 2019. The watch was a present from Mohammed to his father. At the time of the attacks, Mohammed was overseas and was anxious when he could not get hold of his father. Some friends said his father made it out of the mosque while others had contradicting reports. In his search for answers, Mohammed finally sat down to watch the video of the attack only to see that a man resembling his father, wearing a similar watch, had fallen. REUTERS/Edgar Su SEARCH
Mohammed Moustafa shows a watch that his late father 70-year-old Hussein Moustafa had worn during the Christchurch shootings, at their home in Christchurch, New Zealand March 30, 2019. The watch was a present from Mohammed to his father. At the time of the attacks, Mohammed was overseas and was anxious when he could not get hold of his father. Some friends said his father made it out of the mosque while others had contradicting reports. In his search for answers, Mohammed finally sat down to watch the video of the attack only to see that a man resembling his father, wearing a similar watch, had fallen. REUTERS/Edgar Su SEARCH "SHOOTING SURVIVORS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Farid Ahmed (in the wheelchair), a survivor of the Christchurch shootings where her wife Husna was killed, is joined by his relatives as he visits his neighbours to offer thanks for their support, in Christchurch, New Zealand March 24, 2019. When his neighbours heard of his wife's death,
Farid Ahmed (in the wheelchair), a survivor of the Christchurch shootings where her wife Husna was killed, is joined by his relatives as he visits his neighbours to offer thanks for their support, in Christchurch, New Zealand March 24, 2019. When his neighbours heard of his wife's death, "they came running... they were in tears," Ahmed said. "That was wonderful support and expression of love." He is on a mission to bring together his community and spread forgiveness in the wake of the mass shooting that stole his wife's life. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Omar Nabi, 43, originally from Afghanistan, takes a moment to recompose himself as he speaks about his late father, Haji-Daoud Nabi's love for cars at Haji-Daoud's property in Christchurch, New Zealand March 31, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Omar Nabi, 43, originally from Afghanistan, takes a moment to recompose himself as he speaks about his late father, Haji-Daoud Nabi's love for cars at Haji-Daoud's property in Christchurch, New Zealand March 31, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Mark Rangi, a New Zealander based in Sydney and a survivor of Christchurch shootings, shops for groceries with his son Sam at a supermarket in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 27, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Mark Rangi, a New Zealander based in Sydney and a survivor of Christchurch shootings, shops for groceries with his son Sam at a supermarket in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 27, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Zahra Fathy, the widow of 70-year-old Hussein Moustafa, an Egyptian immigrant who lost his life in the Christchurch shootings, embraces a neighbour who came to check on how Zahra was coping, outside her house in Christchurch, New Zealand March 30, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Zahra Fathy, the widow of 70-year-old Hussein Moustafa, an Egyptian immigrant who lost his life in the Christchurch shootings, embraces a neighbour who came to check on how Zahra was coping, outside her house in Christchurch, New Zealand March 30, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Qurans are stacked neatly in a library shed built by Hussein Moustafa, an Egyptian immigrant who lost his life in the Christchurch shootings at Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, April 1, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Qurans are stacked neatly in a library shed built by Hussein Moustafa, an Egyptian immigrant who lost his life in the Christchurch shootings at Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, April 1, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
A photograph of Christchurch shootings survivor Farid Ahmed, his late wife Husna who was killed in the shootings and their daughter, is seen at his house as relatives prepare cards to thank their neighbours for their support, in Christchurch, New Zealand March 24, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
A photograph of Christchurch shootings survivor Farid Ahmed, his late wife Husna who was killed in the shootings and their daughter, is seen at his house as relatives prepare cards to thank their neighbours for their support, in Christchurch, New Zealand March 24, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Farid Ahmed, a survivor of the Christchurch shootings where her wife Husna was killed, is joined in prayer with his neighbours, during his visit to offer thanks for their support, in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 24, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Farid Ahmed, a survivor of the Christchurch shootings where her wife Husna was killed, is joined in prayer with his neighbours, during his visit to offer thanks for their support, in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 24, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Omar Nabi, originally from Afghanistan, and his friend Apa slaughter a sheep to offer as a sacrifice for his late father Haji-Daoud Nabi, at his father's property in Christchurch, New Zealand March 31, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Omar Nabi, originally from Afghanistan, and his friend Apa slaughter a sheep to offer as a sacrifice for his late father Haji-Daoud Nabi, at his father's property in Christchurch, New Zealand March 31, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Hazem Mohammed, who migrated from Iraq 41 years ago, the survivor of the Christchurch shootings, speaks about experiences during the attacks, at his home in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 26, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Hazem Mohammed, who migrated from Iraq 41 years ago, the survivor of the Christchurch shootings, speaks about experiences during the attacks, at his home in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 26, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Sardar Faisal (2nd L) from Pakistan, a survivor of Christchurch shootings, helps to arrange chairs for a special prayer for the victims of the attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 31, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Sardar Faisal (2nd L) from Pakistan, a survivor of Christchurch shootings, helps to arrange chairs for a special prayer for the victims of the attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 31, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Amir Daud, from Pakistan, a survivor of Christchurch shootings shows an exchange on Whatsapp during the day of the shootings with his compatriot Sardar Faisal, also a survivor, in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 27, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
Amir Daud, from Pakistan, a survivor of Christchurch shootings shows an exchange on Whatsapp during the day of the shootings with his compatriot Sardar Faisal, also a survivor, in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 27, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
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