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This article is more than 6 month old.

Direct link between climate change, Cyclone Tauktae; more cyclones in Arabian Sea likely: Experts

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Scientists and meteorologists have found links between the climate change issues and a growing number of cyclones in the Arabian Sea including the present ‘Cyclone Tauktae’, which is likely to hit southern Gujarat on May 18, reported Business Standard.

Direct link between climate change, Cyclone Tauktae; more cyclones in Arabian Sea likely: Experts

Scientists and meteorologists have found links between the climate change issues and a rise in cyclones in the Arabian Sea including the present ‘Cyclone Tauktae’, which is likely to hit southern Gujarat on May 18, reported Business Standard.

Cyclones are fueled by available heat in the water bodies and the conducive temperature for the intensification of the cyclone is 28 degrees celsius and above. However, the scenario is now changing,  as the Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) have been increasing rapidly in the last century, the report mentioned quoting the findings by Climate Trends, a Delhi-based organization engaged in climate change assessment.

As the Bay of Bengal is usually warmer than the Arabian Sea, it results in more cyclones being formed over it. Now with the Sea Surface Temperature (SSTs) increasing rapidly in the last century, the Arabian Sea is also seeing several cyclones, the researchers found.

Cyclones in the Arabian Sea have been increasing in recent years including four witnessed by India in 2108, 2019, 2020, and 2021 which is quite an alarming situation as cyclones in the Arabian Sea have been inconsistent.

Cyclones change in 24 hours

The recent cyclones in the Arabian Sea— Ockhi, Fani and Amphan— had all started as a weak cyclone and rapidly gained status to extremely severe cyclone in less than 24 hours. Cyclone Tauktae is no exception.

Cyclone Tauktae will be the fourth among the pre-Monsoon cyclones over the Arabian Sea to hit India in consecutive years from 2018-2021s, said Dr Roxy Mathew Koll, Scientist, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Lead Author, IPCC, Oceans and Cryosphere. The formation of Cyclone Tauktae also denotes the third consecutive year when a cyclone has come close to the west coast of India.

In a tweet, on May 12, Dr Koll wrote, Arabian Sea used to be cool, but now it's a warm pool—supporting more intense cyclones. Tropical cyclones draw their energy from the warm waters.

The States of Kerala, Karnataka, Goa, Maharashtra and Gujarat are witnessing the fury of the cyclone with floods, land erosion, collapsed houses and thousands of trees uprooted in every state.  The NDRF has been deployed along with the Navy to safeguard lives. Cyclone Tauktae is expected to hit the coastal areas of Gujarat by May 18 as it is currently crossing Goa and Maharashtra.

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