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This Indian tourist spot is among the TIME's world's 100 greatest places to visit

Updated : 2019-08-29 12:27:38

We all have our own bucket list of places and we all aim to strike out almost all the names of the list. The TIME Magazine on Wednesday published a list of 100 World’s Greatest Places across various categories which include museums, parks, restaurants, and hotels. From a Tokyo museum bringing digital art to life to the world’s tallest statue, here are some of the greatest places on the planet.

(Caption Credit: TIME)

#1. Geosea Geothermal Sea Baths, Husavik, Iceland: Opened in August 2018, Geosea draws its mineral-­rich seawaters from two nearby drill holes. It has multiple infinity-­edged pools and a built-­in waterfall, swim-­up bar and bathtub­-warm water averaging around 100°F. The spa operates year round, staying open till midnight in summer and 10 p.m. in winter — a spectacular way to catch the northern lights when swimming after dark. (Image: Stock)
#1. Geosea Geothermal Sea Baths, Husavik, Iceland: Opened in August 2018, Geosea draws its mineral-­rich seawaters from two nearby drill holes. It has multiple infinity-­edged pools and a built-­in waterfall, swim-­up bar and bathtub­-warm water averaging around 100°F. The spa operates year round, staying open till midnight in summer and 10 p.m. in winter — a spectacular way to catch the northern lights when swimming after dark. (Image: Stock)
#2. Camp Adventure, Ronnede, Denmark: Camp Adventure in Denmark opened its 45-metre-tall, hourglass-­shaped tower in March, with a spiralling walkway that allows people to climb above the forest canopy for panoramic views of the surroundings. Located about one hour south of Copenhagen in the Gisselfeld Klosters Skove forest, the camp offers visitors other activities as well, including zip lines and a tree-climbing course that covers 18.5 acres. (Image: Reuters)
#2. Camp Adventure, Ronnede, Denmark: Camp Adventure in Denmark opened its 45-metre-tall, hourglass-­shaped tower in March, with a spiralling walkway that allows people to climb above the forest canopy for panoramic views of the surroundings. Located about one hour south of Copenhagen in the Gisselfeld Klosters Skove forest, the camp offers visitors other activities as well, including zip lines and a tree-climbing course that covers 18.5 acres. (Image: Reuters)
#3. Mori Building Digital Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan: The world’s first museum solely dedicated to digital art has drawn huge crowds — it celebrated its 1 millionth visitor five months after opening in June 2018. Credit its Instagram-worthy immersive environment, which uses a combination of visual projections and physical installations to allow patrons to wade through virtual windblown fields of grass, explore a seemingly infinite crystal world and bounce between galaxies. (Image: Reuters)
#3. Mori Building Digital Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan: The world’s first museum solely dedicated to digital art has drawn huge crowds — it celebrated its 1 millionth visitor five months after opening in June 2018. Credit its Instagram-worthy immersive environment, which uses a combination of visual projections and physical installations to allow patrons to wade through virtual windblown fields of grass, explore a seemingly infinite crystal world and bounce between galaxies. (Image: Reuters)
#4. Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland, Anaheim, California:  At Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, guests don’t simply mingle with their favourite characters, they live among them while customising their own droids at the Droid Depot and visiting Oga’s Cantina, Disneyland’s first public watering hole serving alcoholic space brews and “blue milk.” (Image: Reuters)
#4. Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland, Anaheim, California:  At Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, guests don’t simply mingle with their favourite characters, they live among them while customising their own droids at the Droid Depot and visiting Oga’s Cantina, Disneyland’s first public watering hole serving alcoholic space brews and “blue milk.” (Image: Reuters)
#5. SFER IK, Tulum, Mexico: SFER IK doesn’t look like an ordinary exhibition space — and that’s the point. The Tulum location’s nest-like structure was conceived as a place where avant-garde artists could gather and envision new ways to create, inspired by their unusual environs. Made of locally sourced wood and cement, space’s ceilings and walls are trimmed with plants sprouting along with circular apertures to the world outside. (Image: Stock)
#5. SFER IK, Tulum, Mexico: SFER IK doesn’t look like an ordinary exhibition space — and that’s the point. The Tulum location’s nest-like structure was conceived as a place where avant-garde artists could gather and envision new ways to create, inspired by their unusual environs. Made of locally sourced wood and cement, space’s ceilings and walls are trimmed with plants sprouting along with circular apertures to the world outside. (Image: Stock)
#6. Mata Ki Te Rangi International Dark Sky Sanctuary, Pitcairn Islands: Despite their lack of hotels, the Pitcairn Islands may intrigue tourists with their new International Dark Sky Sanctuary title, which recognizes the island group’s sanctuary — named Mata Ki Te Rangi — as one of just 10 destinations worldwide that have the best conditions for galactic gazing. (Image: Stock)
#6. Mata Ki Te Rangi International Dark Sky Sanctuary, Pitcairn Islands: Despite their lack of hotels, the Pitcairn Islands may intrigue tourists with their new International Dark Sky Sanctuary title, which recognizes the island group’s sanctuary — named Mata Ki Te Rangi — as one of just 10 destinations worldwide that have the best conditions for galactic gazing. (Image: Stock)
#7. Museum of Black Civilisations, Dakar, Senegal: The $34 million project, some 50 years in the making, is designed to be a creative laboratory that will help shape the continent’s future sense of identity, according to museum director Hamady Bocoum. It also hopes to reclaim some of the continent’s lost past: the museum has room for some 18,000 artworks, but many of the galleries are not yet filled. (Image: Reuters)
#7. Museum of Black Civilisations, Dakar, Senegal: The $34 million project, some 50 years in the making, is designed to be a creative laboratory that will help shape the continent’s future sense of identity, according to museum director Hamady Bocoum. It also hopes to reclaim some of the continent’s lost past: the museum has room for some 18,000 artworks, but many of the galleries are not yet filled. (Image: Reuters)
#8. Central Library, Calgary, Canada: Calgary is home to one of North America’s largest library systems, and the city now boasts an architectural masterpiece as the system’s central hub. The downtown complex, designed by the Norwegian firm Snohetta, is flooded with natural light and features several aesthetic odes to its native land: walls made of cedar from nearby British Columbia, a curved facade meant to evoke cloud arches formed by the region’s Chinook winds. Of course, the library also houses an extensive collection of books — over 450,000. (Image: Stock)
#8. Central Library, Calgary, Canada: Calgary is home to one of North America’s largest library systems, and the city now boasts an architectural masterpiece as the system’s central hub. The downtown complex, designed by the Norwegian firm Snohetta, is flooded with natural light and features several aesthetic odes to its native land: walls made of cedar from nearby British Columbia, a curved facade meant to evoke cloud arches formed by the region’s Chinook winds. Of course, the library also houses an extensive collection of books — over 450,000. (Image: Stock)
#9. National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts, Kaohsiung, Taiwan: The former Japanese military base is now home to the largest performing ­arts centre in the world under a single roof. Opened in October 2018, the National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts spans 25 acres in the south of Taiwan. The compound, designed by the Dutch architecture firm Mecanoo, features a roof resembling a canopy inspired by the banyan trees commonly found in the region, which dips to the ground to form the base of an outdoor theater for up to 20,000. (Image: Stock)
#9. National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts, Kaohsiung, Taiwan: The former Japanese military base is now home to the largest performing ­arts centre in the world under a single roof. Opened in October 2018, the National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts spans 25 acres in the south of Taiwan. The compound, designed by the Dutch architecture firm Mecanoo, features a roof resembling a canopy inspired by the banyan trees commonly found in the region, which dips to the ground to form the base of an outdoor theater for up to 20,000. (Image: Stock)
#10. Chillida Leku, Hernani, Spain: A 27-acre outdoor museum filled with late abstract sculptor Eduardo Chillida’s work is once again welcoming walk-ins. Chillida Leku’s Basque farmhouse and art-filled fields were established as a sculpture park in 2000 by Chillida and his wife. Financial difficulties led to a partial closure a decade later, but the site formally reopened in April. Now art aficionados can wander the grounds to witness the more than 40 pieces on display. (Image: Reuters)
#10. Chillida Leku, Hernani, Spain: A 27-acre outdoor museum filled with late abstract sculptor Eduardo Chillida’s work is once again welcoming walk-ins. Chillida Leku’s Basque farmhouse and art-filled fields were established as a sculpture park in 2000 by Chillida and his wife. Financial difficulties led to a partial closure a decade later, but the site formally reopened in April. Now art aficionados can wander the grounds to witness the more than 40 pieces on display. (Image: Reuters)
#11. Helsinki Central Library Oodi, Helsinki, Finland: Finland is one of the world’s most literate countries, and in December it opened a 185,000-sq.-ft. landmark: a library of the future. But what does the future entail? Robot librarians, it seems, and game rooms, recording studios, an immersive 3-D chamber with illuminated walls, a movie theatre and multiple concert areas. (Image: Stock)
#11. Helsinki Central Library Oodi, Helsinki, Finland: Finland is one of the world’s most literate countries, and in December it opened a 185,000-sq.-ft. landmark: a library of the future. But what does the future entail? Robot librarians, it seems, and game rooms, recording studios, an immersive 3-D chamber with illuminated walls, a movie theatre and multiple concert areas. (Image: Stock)
#12. The Gathering Place, Tulsa, Oklahoma: When the philanthropist George B. Kaiser spearheaded the creation of this $465 million green space on Tulsa’s waterfront, he hoped to help unite the city, which has struggled with inequality. The 66-acre park, which is open to the public for free, includes playgrounds, gardens, a skate park, a BMX track, a concert venue and a number of restaurants. (Image: Stock)
#12. The Gathering Place, Tulsa, Oklahoma: When the philanthropist George B. Kaiser spearheaded the creation of this $465 million green space on Tulsa’s waterfront, he hoped to help unite the city, which has struggled with inequality. The 66-acre park, which is open to the public for free, includes playgrounds, gardens, a skate park, a BMX track, a concert venue and a number of restaurants. (Image: Stock)
#13. Zakouma National Park, Chad: In southeastern Chad, Zakouma National Park offers the chance to witness a miracle. The national park’s populations of wild elephants and rhinos had been all but wiped out before its management was taken over in 2010 by the public-­private consortium African Parks. The elephant herd is now one of the largest in Africa, and the rhinos are also making a comeback. (Image: Stock)
#13. Zakouma National Park, Chad: In southeastern Chad, Zakouma National Park offers the chance to witness a miracle. The national park’s populations of wild elephants and rhinos had been all but wiped out before its management was taken over in 2010 by the public-­private consortium African Parks. The elephant herd is now one of the largest in Africa, and the rhinos are also making a comeback. (Image: Stock)
#14. Pohoiki in Isaac Hale Beach Park, Big Island, Hawaii: Hawaiian tradition attributes volcanic activity to Pele, a deity often called the goddess of volcanoes and fire. When Pele destroys, she also creates — and last year she increased the size of the island by more than 1 sq. miles, including a new black-sand beach at Isaac Hale Beach Park. (Image: Reuters)
#14. Pohoiki in Isaac Hale Beach Park, Big Island, Hawaii: Hawaiian tradition attributes volcanic activity to Pele, a deity often called the goddess of volcanoes and fire. When Pele destroys, she also creates — and last year she increased the size of the island by more than 1 sq. miles, including a new black-sand beach at Isaac Hale Beach Park. (Image: Reuters)
#15. VAC Library, Hanoi, Vietnam: Part library, part urban farm, part playground, this farming architects project in Hanoi is geared toward teaching kids about ecosystems and agriculture. The VAC Library’s climbable wooden structure contains both a small collection of books and a mini-ecosystem comprising a garden, a fish pond and a chicken coop — all connected through aquaponics.
#15. VAC Library, Hanoi, Vietnam: Part library, part urban farm, part playground, this farming architects project in Hanoi is geared toward teaching kids about ecosystems and agriculture. The VAC Library’s climbable wooden structure contains both a small collection of books and a mini-ecosystem comprising a garden, a fish pond and a chicken coop — all connected through aquaponics.
#31. Statue of Unity, Gujarat, India: The world’s tallest statue, which was unveiled last year, stands at 597 ft. on an island in the Narmada River. It towers over the Sardar Sarovar Dam in the western Indian state of Gujarat, offering visitors the chance to see views of the nearby mountain ranges from its chest. The tourist attraction pays homage to Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, who became India’s first deputy prime minister in 1947. (Image: IANS)
#31. Statue of Unity, Gujarat, India: The world’s tallest statue, which was unveiled last year, stands at 597 ft. on an island in the Narmada River. It towers over the Sardar Sarovar Dam in the western Indian state of Gujarat, offering visitors the chance to see views of the nearby mountain ranges from its chest. The tourist attraction pays homage to Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, who became India’s first deputy prime minister in 1947. (Image: IANS)
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