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Night fishing in Jamaica's moonlit sea in eerie silence

Updated : 2019-09-19 14:29:49

Spearfishing at night in Jamaica is illegal, especially in the sanctuaries set up to protect the island country's endangered coral reefs and replenish fish stocks. The restrictions have taken a toll on many Jamaicans' livelihoods, in a place where jobs can be scarce.

Nicholas Bingham, left, and Delroy Gooden, prepare to climb over a wall to go night spearfishing, which is banned, in Stewart Town, Jamaica. Bingham and Gooden say they resort to illegal night spearfishing to make up for lost wages from the sanctuary's restrictions. Some fish and other sea creatures sleep in the reef at night making them easier to catch than during the day. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Nicholas Bingham, left, and Delroy Gooden, prepare to climb over a wall to go night spearfishing, which is banned, in Stewart Town, Jamaica. Bingham and Gooden say they resort to illegal night spearfishing to make up for lost wages from the sanctuary's restrictions. Some fish and other sea creatures sleep in the reef at night making them easier to catch than during the day. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
White River Fish Sanctuary warden Lipton Bailey prepares to head out on a patrol in White River, Jamaica.
White River Fish Sanctuary warden Lipton Bailey prepares to head out on a patrol in White River, Jamaica. "We are looking for violators," Bailey said. "Sometimes you find spearmen. They think they're smart. We try to beat them at their game." (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Nicholas Bingham stands at the water's edge before jumping in to go night spearfishing, which is banned, in Stewart Town, Jamaica. The warm tropical air gently pushes waves against the concrete steps leading down a cliff and into the ocean, the jumping-off point tonight for the night spearfishermen. Down those same steps is where some of these men learned to swim as young boys. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Nicholas Bingham stands at the water's edge before jumping in to go night spearfishing, which is banned, in Stewart Town, Jamaica. The warm tropical air gently pushes waves against the concrete steps leading down a cliff and into the ocean, the jumping-off point tonight for the night spearfishermen. Down those same steps is where some of these men learned to swim as young boys. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Nicholas Bingham enters the water to go night spearfishing, which is banned, especially in the sanctuaries set up to protect the island's endangered coral reefs and replenish fish stocks, in Stewart Town, Jamaica. The restrictions have taken a toll on many Jamaicans' livelihoods, in a place where jobs can be scarce. In some places, fishermen have joined with local businesses to form marine associations and negotiate a no-fishing zone. But that simple line in the water must be enforced. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Nicholas Bingham enters the water to go night spearfishing, which is banned, especially in the sanctuaries set up to protect the island's endangered coral reefs and replenish fish stocks, in Stewart Town, Jamaica. The restrictions have taken a toll on many Jamaicans' livelihoods, in a place where jobs can be scarce. In some places, fishermen have joined with local businesses to form marine associations and negotiate a no-fishing zone. But that simple line in the water must be enforced. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Nicholas Bingham enters the water to go night spearfishing, which is banned, in Stewart Town.
Nicholas Bingham enters the water to go night spearfishing, which is banned, in Stewart Town. "There are not many other jobs to do. What am I going to do, take up a gun? (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Delroy Gooden spearfishes at night, which is banned, in Stewart Town, Jamaica. Gooden says he goes spearfishing at night three to four times a week. Tonight he'll end up selling his catch for 3,000 Jamaican dollars, the equivalent of about 22 US dollars. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Delroy Gooden spearfishes at night, which is banned, in Stewart Town, Jamaica. Gooden says he goes spearfishing at night three to four times a week. Tonight he'll end up selling his catch for 3,000 Jamaican dollars, the equivalent of about 22 US dollars. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Nicholas Bingham uses an underwater flashlight to spearfish at night. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Nicholas Bingham uses an underwater flashlight to spearfish at night. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Nicholas Bingham catches a fish using a speargun while spearfishing at night. Using only handheld waterproof flashlights under a moonlit sky as they skirt the boundary of the Boscobel Fish Sanctuary, Bingham swims over the reef and seagrass meadows, diving down to shoot lobsters and fish along the way. The eerie silence beneath the surface is punctured only by a clanking sound as their spears make an impact. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Nicholas Bingham catches a fish using a speargun while spearfishing at night. Using only handheld waterproof flashlights under a moonlit sky as they skirt the boundary of the Boscobel Fish Sanctuary, Bingham swims over the reef and seagrass meadows, diving down to shoot lobsters and fish along the way. The eerie silence beneath the surface is punctured only by a clanking sound as their spears make an impact. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
White River Fish Sanctuary warden Mark Lobban steers the boat while patrolling the no-take zone for illegal fishermen in Ocho Rios. Lobban was driving a boat, appropriately called the Interceptor, up and down the coast under the same moonlit sky where 9 kilometres (5 miles) away two-night spearfishermen are skirting the boundary of another sanctuary hoping to evade any patrols. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
White River Fish Sanctuary warden Mark Lobban steers the boat while patrolling the no-take zone for illegal fishermen in Ocho Rios. Lobban was driving a boat, appropriately called the Interceptor, up and down the coast under the same moonlit sky where 9 kilometres (5 miles) away two-night spearfishermen are skirting the boundary of another sanctuary hoping to evade any patrols. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
White River Fish Sanctuary warden Donald Anderson shines a spotlight on the coast looking for illegal fishermen while patrolling the no-take zone under the moonlight in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. The patrols carry no weapons, so they must master the art of persuasion. And they often meet resistance.
White River Fish Sanctuary warden Donald Anderson shines a spotlight on the coast looking for illegal fishermen while patrolling the no-take zone under the moonlight in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. The patrols carry no weapons, so they must master the art of persuasion. And they often meet resistance. "They threaten us and they give you trouble in the reef," Anderson said. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
White River Fish Sanctuary wardens Mark Lobban, left, and Donald Anderson patrol the no-take zone for illegal fishermen under the moonlight in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. Two years ago, fishermen joined with local businesses to form a marine association and negotiate the boundaries for a no-fishing zone stretching two miles along the coast. A simple line in the water is hardly a deterrent, however, for a boundary to be meaningful, it must be enforced. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
White River Fish Sanctuary wardens Mark Lobban, left, and Donald Anderson patrol the no-take zone for illegal fishermen under the moonlight in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. Two years ago, fishermen joined with local businesses to form a marine association and negotiate the boundaries for a no-fishing zone stretching two miles along the coast. A simple line in the water is hardly a deterrent, however, for a boundary to be meaningful, it must be enforced. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
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