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In pictures: Last day at sea for migrants rescued off Libya

Updated : 2019-09-29 14:38:09

More than 180 men, women and children arrived in Italy this week after being rescued off the shores of Libya as they attempted to reach Europe in small boats that had little chance of making it across the Mediterranean Sea. An Associated Press reporter embedded on the humanitarian ship Ocean Viking documented their journey.

Moussa Fanta, 27, from Guinea, poses for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy hours before disembarking. He is known as Rozy back home and loves reggae. He was in awe of a gargantuan cruise ship moored on the other side of the straight of Messina when the Ocean Viking docked in Italy Tuesday. “It’s so amazing!” he said. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Moussa Fanta, 27, from Guinea, poses for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy hours before disembarking. He is known as Rozy back home and loves reggae. He was in awe of a gargantuan cruise ship moored on the other side of the straight of Messina when the Ocean Viking docked in Italy Tuesday. “It’s so amazing!” he said. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Maro Reele, 22, from Guinea poses for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy, Monday hours before disembarking. Reele travelled alone but often helped the mothers on board, taking care of the little children, playing with them and even carrying them while they took a nap on his shoulders. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Maro Reele, 22, from Guinea poses for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy, Monday hours before disembarking. Reele travelled alone but often helped the mothers on board, taking care of the little children, playing with them and even carrying them while they took a nap on his shoulders. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Abdul Kerim, 20, from Togo, poses for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy hours before disembarking. Kerim fled his country because he was persecuted for protesting against the government. He wants to reunite with brothers and aunts living in Germany and hopes to be granted asylum although he left a wife and a two-year-old son in Togo. He is open to any kind of work, though he dreams of having his own construction company. It wasn’t Abdul Kerim’s first attempt at crossing the Mediterranean, he was intercepted by the Libyan Coast Guard on his first try and sent to a detention centre where there was no clean water to drink. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Abdul Kerim, 20, from Togo, poses for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy hours before disembarking. Kerim fled his country because he was persecuted for protesting against the government. He wants to reunite with brothers and aunts living in Germany and hopes to be granted asylum although he left a wife and a two-year-old son in Togo. He is open to any kind of work, though he dreams of having his own construction company. It wasn’t Abdul Kerim’s first attempt at crossing the Mediterranean, he was intercepted by the Libyan Coast Guard on his first try and sent to a detention centre where there was no clean water to drink. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Nelson Oyedele, 37, his wife Joy, 28, from Nigeria, and their children Dare, 8, center, Angel, 10, right, Valerie, 6, left, and Elijah, 4, bottom, pose for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy hours before disembarking. Oyedele, 37, said he fled violence and poverty in Nigeria with his wife and four small children. He had to pay a ransom to get his family back after they were separated by smugglers in the desert on the way to Libya. His daughter Angel wants to become a doctor. Nelson and his family were the only ones travelling as a complete family. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Nelson Oyedele, 37, his wife Joy, 28, from Nigeria, and their children Dare, 8, center, Angel, 10, right, Valerie, 6, left, and Elijah, 4, bottom, pose for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy hours before disembarking. Oyedele, 37, said he fled violence and poverty in Nigeria with his wife and four small children. He had to pay a ransom to get his family back after they were separated by smugglers in the desert on the way to Libya. His daughter Angel wants to become a doctor. Nelson and his family were the only ones travelling as a complete family. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Latifa Mustapha Muhamed, 30, left, and Suana Esezobor, 22, right, both from Nigeria, pose for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy hours before disembarking. Latifa and Suana are not blood relatives but call themselves sister of the heart. They’ve supported each other throughout the journey and are always together. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Latifa Mustapha Muhamed, 30, left, and Suana Esezobor, 22, right, both from Nigeria, pose for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy hours before disembarking. Latifa and Suana are not blood relatives but call themselves sister of the heart. They’ve supported each other throughout the journey and are always together. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Malamin Baragie, 24, of Gambia and Rose Monembem, 22, of Cameroon pose for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy hours before disembarking. Malamin and Rose left Cameroon together to find work and a better life but also because Malamin's family did not approve of their union because he is Muslim and she is Christian. They were separated when detained in a Libyan prison where they were both abused. Rose left a two -year-old son behind and loves music. To forget her sorrows she dances sings and plays the drum. “It’s my best distraction,” she says. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Malamin Baragie, 24, of Gambia and Rose Monembem, 22, of Cameroon pose for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy hours before disembarking. Malamin and Rose left Cameroon together to find work and a better life but also because Malamin's family did not approve of their union because he is Muslim and she is Christian. They were separated when detained in a Libyan prison where they were both abused. Rose left a two -year-old son behind and loves music. To forget her sorrows she dances sings and plays the drum. “It’s my best distraction,” she says. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Eclador Ngatcho, 40, from Cameroon, pose for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy, Monday hours before disembarking. Ngatcho used to work as a delivery driver in his home country of Cameroon where his two daughters (one of whom was born after he left) still live with their mother. He left to find a better job to support his growing family and ended up in Libya where he was sent to a detention centre. He was beaten when he couldn’t afford to pay the ransom the prison guards asked from him and was forced to work as a cook. He eventually escaped. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Eclador Ngatcho, 40, from Cameroon, pose for a portrait aboard the humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking, in Italian waters off the Sicilian town of Messina, southern Italy, Monday hours before disembarking. Ngatcho used to work as a delivery driver in his home country of Cameroon where his two daughters (one of whom was born after he left) still live with their mother. He left to find a better job to support his growing family and ended up in Libya where he was sent to a detention centre. He was beaten when he couldn’t afford to pay the ransom the prison guards asked from him and was forced to work as a cook. He eventually escaped. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Lillian Nwandalo, 28, from Nigeria, is 8 months pregnant. She travelled alone and doesn’t know what gender her baby is yet but at least he will be born in a peaceful place, she says. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Lillian Nwandalo, 28, from Nigeria, is 8 months pregnant. She travelled alone and doesn’t know what gender her baby is yet but at least he will be born in a peaceful place, she says. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Prudence Aimee, 30, from Cameroon poses for a photo with her children from left to right Ange, Wifrid,1, and William, 3. Prudence gave birth to her third son Sept. 13, just three days before boarding an overcrowded wooden boat in the hope of getting her children out of war-torn Libya. Her husband was not able to join them and stayed behind. Her eldest son William was very excited to arrive in Italy and waved at every boat that passed by while saying “Hey! Hey! Hey!” (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Prudence Aimee, 30, from Cameroon poses for a photo with her children from left to right Ange, Wifrid,1, and William, 3. Prudence gave birth to her third son Sept. 13, just three days before boarding an overcrowded wooden boat in the hope of getting her children out of war-torn Libya. Her husband was not able to join them and stayed behind. Her eldest son William was very excited to arrive in Italy and waved at every boat that passed by while saying “Hey! Hey! Hey!” (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Single mother Fatima Abdul, from Nigeria, and her children from left to right, Faridos, almost 2, Fawas, 13, and Quadri, 7. Fatima feared for her children’s safety and left Nigeria. Her youngest daughter who will be turning 2 soon may not remember their time in Libya. But the other two boys age 13 and 7 do. “It was a very bad place” the eldest said. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
Single mother Fatima Abdul, from Nigeria, and her children from left to right, Faridos, almost 2, Fawas, 13, and Quadri, 7. Fatima feared for her children’s safety and left Nigeria. Her youngest daughter who will be turning 2 soon may not remember their time in Libya. But the other two boys age 13 and 7 do. “It was a very bad place” the eldest said. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
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