• SENSEX
    NIFTY 50
Unwind

In Pictures: Indian coal mines still burning after a century

Updated : 2019-11-10 09:48:01

The fires started in 1916. More than a century later, coal pits in Jharia, in a remote corner of India's eastern Jharkhand state, continue to spew flames and clouds of poisonous fumes into the air. Coal is an important contributor to India's growth, supporting its iron and steel industries and generating more than half the country's power. In Jharia, the heart of India's coal industry, the livelihoods of half a million people depend on it.

An excavator is used at an open-cast mine in the village of Rajapur in Jharia, a remote corner of eastern Jharkhand. The fires started in coal pits in eastern India in 1916. More than a century later, they are still spewing flames and clouds of poisonous fumes into the air, forcing residents to brave sizzling temperatures, deadly sinkholes and toxic gases. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
An excavator is used at an open-cast mine in the village of Rajapur in Jharia, a remote corner of eastern Jharkhand. The fires started in coal pits in eastern India in 1916. More than a century later, they are still spewing flames and clouds of poisonous fumes into the air, forcing residents to brave sizzling temperatures, deadly sinkholes and toxic gases. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
A labourer smiles as he prepares to drink water during a break from loading coal into trucks for transportation in the village of Godhar in Jharia, a remote corner of eastern Jharkhand. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
A labourer smiles as he prepares to drink water during a break from loading coal into trucks for transportation in the village of Godhar in Jharia, a remote corner of eastern Jharkhand. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Flames billow out of the fissures on the ground above coal mines in the village of Liloripathra in Jharia. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Flames billow out of the fissures on the ground above coal mines in the village of Liloripathra in Jharia. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Children of labourers who work in coal fields play a game of soccer in the village of Rajapur in Jharia, a remote corner of eastern Jharkhand. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Children of labourers who work in coal fields play a game of soccer in the village of Rajapur in Jharia, a remote corner of eastern Jharkhand. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
A labourer keeps watching as coal is unloaded from a truck in the village of Rajapur in Jharia. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
A labourer keeps watching as coal is unloaded from a truck in the village of Rajapur in Jharia. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Labourers lift a large basket filled with coal before loading it onto a truck for transportation. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Labourers lift a large basket filled with coal before loading it onto a truck for transportation. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Flames rise out of the fissures on the ground above coal mines in the village of Liloripathra in Jharia. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Flames rise out of the fissures on the ground above coal mines in the village of Liloripathra in Jharia. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Labourers eat lunch at a coal loading site in the village of Godhar in Jharia. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Labourers eat lunch at a coal loading site in the village of Godhar in Jharia. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
A labourer smiles as she interacts with fellow labourers during a break from loading coal into trucks for transportation. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
A labourer smiles as she interacts with fellow labourers during a break from loading coal into trucks for transportation. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Labourers lift a large piece of coal before loading it onto a truck for transportation. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Labourers lift a large piece of coal before loading it onto a truck for transportation. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
The fires started in coal pits in eastern India in 1916. More than a century later, they are still spewing flames and clouds of poisonous fumes into the air, forcing residents to brave sizzling temperatures, deadly sinkholes and toxic gases. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
The fires started in coal pits in eastern India in 1916. More than a century later, they are still spewing flames and clouds of poisonous fumes into the air, forcing residents to brave sizzling temperatures, deadly sinkholes and toxic gases. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
Live TV

Ask Our Experts CNBC TV18