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How global warming affects the Blue Planet?

Updated : 2019-08-30 17:14:45

Global warming has caused tremendous changes over a period of time. From the North Pole to the South Pole, a significant rise in the temperature, drastic weather events, shifting wildlife populations and habitats, and a range of other impacts on ecosystem are experienced. Despite, humans continue to add toxic greenhouse gasses to the atmosphere, resulting in the depletion of the quality of life on the huge biosphere. Here are the impacts of global warming on the green planet:

<strong>Amazon Rainforest:</strong> Amazon is the world’s largest tropical rainforest with over 5.5 million square kilometer area. However, the increased rate of deforestation and wildfire is tremendously cutting down the forest area causing a threat to more than 40,000 plant species, 1,300 bird species, 3,000 types of fish, 430 mammals, and a whopping 2.5 million different insects. Ironically, at the point when the world needs billion more trees to tackle global warming, Amazon is approaching a tipping point, after which it will irreversibly degrade into a dry savannah.
Amazon Rainforest: Amazon is the world’s largest tropical rainforest with over 5.5 million square kilometer area. However, the increased rate of deforestation and wildfire is tremendously cutting down the forest area causing a threat to more than 40,000 plant species, 1,300 bird species, 3,000 types of fish, 430 mammals, and a whopping 2.5 million different insects. Ironically, at the point when the world needs billion more trees to tackle global warming, Amazon is approaching a tipping point, after which it will irreversibly degrade into a dry savannah.
<strong>Glaciers and Ice Sheets:</strong> From the Arctic to Peru, from Switzerland to the equatorial glaciers of Man Jaya in Indonesia, massive ice fields, huge glaciers, and sea ice is disappearing, fast. Since 1912, more than 80 percent of snows of Kilimanjaro have been melted. Speaking of the most central and eastern Himalayan glaciers, researchers predicted their disappearance by 2035. Arctic sea ice has also thinned significantly over the past 50 years and its extent have reduced by about 10 percent in the past 30 years. In addition, NASA's repeated laser altimeter readings show the edges of Greenland's ice sheet shrinking. And thawing permafrost has resulted in the ground to subside more than 15 feet in parts of Alaska.
Glaciers and Ice Sheets: From the Arctic to Peru, from Switzerland to the equatorial glaciers of Man Jaya in Indonesia, massive ice fields, huge glaciers, and sea ice is disappearing, fast. Since 1912, more than 80 percent of snows of Kilimanjaro have been melted. Speaking of the most central and eastern Himalayan glaciers, researchers predicted their disappearance by 2035. Arctic sea ice has also thinned significantly over the past 50 years and its extent have reduced by about 10 percent in the past 30 years. In addition, NASA's repeated laser altimeter readings show the edges of Greenland's ice sheet shrinking. And thawing permafrost has resulted in the ground to subside more than 15 feet in parts of Alaska.
<strong>Coral Reefs:</strong> In the first few months of 2016, the Reef experienced the worst coral bleaching event, erupted by the mining and burning of fossil fuels like coal and gas. In addition, almost half of all corals north of Lizard Island to the tip of Cape York, a distance of approximately 1,000 kilometers, died. Also from Lizard Island south to Cairns, around 16 percent of corals died. Overall, 22 percent of the Great Barrier Reef's corals died in just a few months.
Coral Reefs: In the first few months of 2016, the Reef experienced the worst coral bleaching event, erupted by the mining and burning of fossil fuels like coal and gas. In addition, almost half of all corals north of Lizard Island to the tip of Cape York, a distance of approximately 1,000 kilometers, died. Also from Lizard Island south to Cairns, around 16 percent of corals died. Overall, 22 percent of the Great Barrier Reef's corals died in just a few months.
<strong>Islands:</strong> Small island nations such as those in the Pacific Ocean are on the verge to be wiped off the map. The people of Kiribati are among the world’s first refugees of sea-level rise. The predicted rises in sea level and extreme weather events threaten the existence of this low-lying country made up of 33 coral atolls and reef islands. Rising sea levels are threatening access to land in coastal areas, particularly low-lying islands. As a result, land used for agriculture will no longer be fertile, due to contamination by seawater. Speaking of the critical coastal habitats, natural and man-made barriers such as cliffs and coastal developments stand in the way of migrating further inland.
Islands: Small island nations such as those in the Pacific Ocean are on the verge to be wiped off the map. The people of Kiribati are among the world’s first refugees of sea-level rise. The predicted rises in sea level and extreme weather events threaten the existence of this low-lying country made up of 33 coral atolls and reef islands. Rising sea levels are threatening access to land in coastal areas, particularly low-lying islands. As a result, land used for agriculture will no longer be fertile, due to contamination by seawater. Speaking of the critical coastal habitats, natural and man-made barriers such as cliffs and coastal developments stand in the way of migrating further inland.
<strong>Ecosystem:</strong> Global warming has made many habitats hostile to live. This, in turn, led to the migration of a large number of species. As a result, some butterflies, foxes, and alpine plants have migrated farther north or to higher, cooler areas. Depleting ice has also challenged species such as the Adélie penguin in Antarctica, where a large population on the western peninsula has collapsed by 90 percent or more. In nutshell, some species will move farther or become more successful, others, such as polar bears, won’t be able to adapt and could become extinct. Note, damage caused to any of the members in the food chain affects the whole chain and eventually the ecosystem.
Ecosystem: Global warming has made many habitats hostile to live. This, in turn, led to the migration of a large number of species. As a result, some butterflies, foxes, and alpine plants have migrated farther north or to higher, cooler areas. Depleting ice has also challenged species such as the Adélie penguin in Antarctica, where a large population on the western peninsula has collapsed by 90 percent or more. In nutshell, some species will move farther or become more successful, others, such as polar bears, won’t be able to adapt and could become extinct. Note, damage caused to any of the members in the food chain affects the whole chain and eventually the ecosystem.
<strong>Oceans:</strong> The rise in temperature has not just resulted in the melting of glaciers and ice sheets but also led to increased temperature stratification and escalated sea level. Change in water temperatures can directly affect the development and growth of most fish and cephalopods such as octopus and squid. It has also threatened to cause mass migration of marine species in search of the right conditions for feeding and spawning. Warm waters also cause coral bleaching, which in turn impacts coral reef ecosystems that are home to most of the ocean’s biodiversity and provide crucial sources of food for people.
Oceans: The rise in temperature has not just resulted in the melting of glaciers and ice sheets but also led to increased temperature stratification and escalated sea level. Change in water temperatures can directly affect the development and growth of most fish and cephalopods such as octopus and squid. It has also threatened to cause mass migration of marine species in search of the right conditions for feeding and spawning. Warm waters also cause coral bleaching, which in turn impacts coral reef ecosystems that are home to most of the ocean’s biodiversity and provide crucial sources of food for people.
<strong>Season Creep:</strong> Season creep, which is the gradual change in the length of seasons, has shifted the hottest and the coldest days of the years by almost 2 days earlier. Indubitably, seasons have a direct impact on living beings and their life processes such as reproduction, migration, blooming and many more. However, long-distance migrants, hibernating species and tight mutualistic associations seem especially vulnerable to the season creep. Speaking of its outcome, unexpected rainfall, delayed spring, shorter and milder winters, and other such changes are reported around the globe.
Season Creep: Season creep, which is the gradual change in the length of seasons, has shifted the hottest and the coldest days of the years by almost 2 days earlier. Indubitably, seasons have a direct impact on living beings and their life processes such as reproduction, migration, blooming and many more. However, long-distance migrants, hibernating species and tight mutualistic associations seem especially vulnerable to the season creep. Speaking of its outcome, unexpected rainfall, delayed spring, shorter and milder winters, and other such changes are reported around the globe.
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