• SENSEX
    NIFTY 50
Unwind

In Pictures: Saving endangered gorillas

Updated : 2019-11-03 11:48:55

The late American primatologist Dian Fossey, who began the world’s longest-running gorilla study here in 1967, would likely be surprised any mountain gorillas are left to study. Alarmed by rising rates of poaching and deforestation in central Africa, she predicted the species could go extinct by 2000.

A silverback mountain gorilla named Segasira looks up as he lies under a tree in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. The late American primatologist Dian Fossey, who began the world’s longest-running gorilla study here in 1967, would likely be surprised any mountain gorillas are left to study. Alarmed by rising rates of poaching and deforestation in central Africa, she predicted the species could go extinct by 2000. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
A silverback mountain gorilla named Segasira looks up as he lies under a tree in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. The late American primatologist Dian Fossey, who began the world’s longest-running gorilla study here in 1967, would likely be surprised any mountain gorillas are left to study. Alarmed by rising rates of poaching and deforestation in central Africa, she predicted the species could go extinct by 2000. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Gorilla trackers Emmanuel Bizagwira, left, and Safari Gabriel search for members of the Agasha group in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. These gorilla trackers are the backbone of the entire conservation project. Their work enables the scientists, tour guides and veterinarians to find gorillas quickly and do their jobs. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Gorilla trackers Emmanuel Bizagwira, left, and Safari Gabriel search for members of the Agasha group in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. These gorilla trackers are the backbone of the entire conservation project. Their work enables the scientists, tour guides and veterinarians to find gorillas quickly and do their jobs. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Once depicted in legends and films like “King Kong” as fearsome beasts, gorillas are actually languid primates that eat only plants and insects and live in fairly stable, extended family groups. Their strength and chest-thumping displays are generally reserved for contests between male rivals. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Once depicted in legends and films like “King Kong” as fearsome beasts, gorillas are actually languid primates that eat only plants and insects and live in fairly stable, extended family groups. Their strength and chest-thumping displays are generally reserved for contests between male rivals. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Gorilla trackers Emmanuel Bizagwira, right, and Safari Gabriel observe two gorillas from the Agasha group as they play in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. George Schaller, a renowned biologist and gorilla expert, conducted the first detailed studies of mountain gorillas in the 1950s and early ‘60s, in what was then the Belgian Congo. He also was the first to discover that wild gorillas could, over time, become comfortable with periodic human presence, a boon to researchers and, later, tourists. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Gorilla trackers Emmanuel Bizagwira, right, and Safari Gabriel observe two gorillas from the Agasha group as they play in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. George Schaller, a renowned biologist and gorilla expert, conducted the first detailed studies of mountain gorillas in the 1950s and early ‘60s, in what was then the Belgian Congo. He also was the first to discover that wild gorillas could, over time, become comfortable with periodic human presence, a boon to researchers and, later, tourists. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Children watch a drone flying near the Volcanoes National Park in Kinigi, Rwanda. In 2005, the government adopted a model to steer 5 percent of tourism revenue from Volcanoes National Park to build infrastructure in surrounding villages, including schools and health clinics. Two years ago, the share was raised to 10 percent. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Children watch a drone flying near the Volcanoes National Park in Kinigi, Rwanda. In 2005, the government adopted a model to steer 5 percent of tourism revenue from Volcanoes National Park to build infrastructure in surrounding villages, including schools and health clinics. Two years ago, the share was raised to 10 percent. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Gorilla tracker Fidele searches for gorillas from the Titus group in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. The trackers are the backbone of the entire conservation project. Their work enables the scientists, tour guides and veterinarians to find gorillas quickly and do their jobs. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Gorilla tracker Fidele searches for gorillas from the Titus group in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. The trackers are the backbone of the entire conservation project. Their work enables the scientists, tour guides and veterinarians to find gorillas quickly and do their jobs. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Residents stand outside buildings as the sun rises in Kinigi, Rwanda. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Residents stand outside buildings as the sun rises in Kinigi, Rwanda. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Children attend class at the Nyabitsinde Primary School near the Volcanoes National Park in Kinigi, Rwanda.  (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Children attend class at the Nyabitsinde Primary School near the Volcanoes National Park in Kinigi, Rwanda.  (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Fabien Uwimana, a French and English teacher, poses for a portrait at the Nyabitsinde Primary School in Kinigi, Rwanda. “The money that built this school comes from tourism,” he says. “More children today can go to school.” (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Fabien Uwimana, a French and English teacher, poses for a portrait at the Nyabitsinde Primary School in Kinigi, Rwanda. “The money that built this school comes from tourism,” he says. “More children today can go to school.” (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Gorilla tracker Gabriel Safari talks on the radio as he monitors gorillas from the Agasha group in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. Each morning, Gabriel’s job is to locate the whereabouts of the 24-member gorilla family, then alert the park warden. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Gorilla tracker Gabriel Safari talks on the radio as he monitors gorillas from the Agasha group in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. Each morning, Gabriel’s job is to locate the whereabouts of the 24-member gorilla family, then alert the park warden. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Biologist Jean Paul Hirwa walks down a trail to observe mountain gorillas in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. Hirwa is part of the world’s longest-running gorilla study _ a project begun in 1967 by famed American primatologist Dian Fossey. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Biologist Jean Paul Hirwa walks down a trail to observe mountain gorillas in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. Hirwa is part of the world’s longest-running gorilla study _ a project begun in 1967 by famed American primatologist Dian Fossey. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
A concerted and sustained conservation campaign has averted the worst and given a second chance to these great apes, which share about 98 percent of human DNA. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
A concerted and sustained conservation campaign has averted the worst and given a second chance to these great apes, which share about 98 percent of human DNA. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Urwibutso, Segasira and Pato, three silverback mountain gorillas eat plants in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Urwibutso, Segasira and Pato, three silverback mountain gorillas eat plants in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
A silverback mountain gorilla named Pato sits in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. “The population of mountain gorillas is still vulnerable,” says George Schaller, a renowned biologist and gorilla expert. “But their numbers are now growing, and that’s remarkable.” (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
A silverback mountain gorilla named Pato sits in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. “The population of mountain gorillas is still vulnerable,” says George Schaller, a renowned biologist and gorilla expert. “But their numbers are now growing, and that’s remarkable.” (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Jean Claude Masengesho draws a silverback gorilla in Kinigi, Rwanda. He would like to someday become a tour guide, which would earn him about $320 monthly. The obstacle is that most tour guides have attended college, and the 21-year old isn’t sure how his family can afford tuition. “It’s my dream, but it’s very hard,” he says. “In this village, every young person’s dream is to work in the park.” (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Jean Claude Masengesho draws a silverback gorilla in Kinigi, Rwanda. He would like to someday become a tour guide, which would earn him about $320 monthly. The obstacle is that most tour guides have attended college, and the 21-year old isn’t sure how his family can afford tuition. “It’s my dream, but it’s very hard,” he says. “In this village, every young person’s dream is to work in the park.” (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Live TV

Ask Our Experts CNBC TV18