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Hong Kong firms, lacking riot insurance, pick up pieces from protest damage

Updated : 2019-10-21 12:38:40

Hong Kong's businesses will likely foot the bill for vandalism inflicted over the past four months during the territory's most violent protests in living memory as few of them bought insurance coverage for riot damage, industry insiders said.

Businesses big and small have suffered smashed windows, graffiti and even fire for their perceived support of mainland China by activists concerned that the central government in Beijing is exerting increased control over the special administrative region at the cost of democratic freedoms.

A man inspects a Bestmart store which was vandalised during Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. Hong Kong's businesses will likely foot the bill for vandalism inflicted over the past four months during the territory's most violent protests in living memory as few of them bought insurance coverage for riot damage, industry insiders said.  (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
A man inspects a Bestmart store which was vandalised during Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. Hong Kong's businesses will likely foot the bill for vandalism inflicted over the past four months during the territory's most violent protests in living memory as few of them bought insurance coverage for riot damage, industry insiders said.  (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
Bank workers clean the entrance of their bank branch which was vandalised during Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. Businesses big and small have suffered smashed windows, graffiti and even fire for their perceived support of mainland China by activists concerned that the central government in Beijing is exerting increased control over the special administrative region at the cost of democratic freedoms. (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
Bank workers clean the entrance of their bank branch which was vandalised during Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. Businesses big and small have suffered smashed windows, graffiti and even fire for their perceived support of mainland China by activists concerned that the central government in Beijing is exerting increased control over the special administrative region at the cost of democratic freedoms. (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
People inspect a shop which was vandalised during Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. While businesses flood insurers with claims for such damage, few are likely to be fully compensated as Hong Kong insurance usually protects against events such as fire and natural disasters, such as typhoons. (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
People inspect a shop which was vandalised during Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. While businesses flood insurers with claims for such damage, few are likely to be fully compensated as Hong Kong insurance usually protects against events such as fire and natural disasters, such as typhoons. (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
Signs reading
Signs reading "Sorry" and "Sorry... free HK" are posted at aluminium roll down shutters of a shop during vandalised during Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
A man inspects a shop which was vandalised during Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
A man inspects a shop which was vandalised during Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
Municipality workers clean the debris of Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
Municipality workers clean the debris of Sunday's anti-government protest in Hong Kong. (REUTERS/Umit Bektas)
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