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End of lockdown to uncork pent-up mourning for the lost

Updated : 2020-05-04 20:27:32

As body after body has passed through his rubber-gloved hands, sealed in double-layered bags for disposal, Paris undertaker Franck Vasseur has become increasingly concerned about the future after the coronavirus pandemic. All these people ferried in his hearse to cremations that their loved ones couldn't attend: when will they be mourned?

Pallbearers, Louis Mercier, right, and Allan Pottier, left, prepare to carry the body of a 105-year-old woman as they prepare her for a funeral at a mortuary, in Paris as nationwide confinement continues to counter the COVID-19 virus. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Pallbearers, Louis Mercier, right, and Allan Pottier, left, prepare to carry the body of a 105-year-old woman as they prepare her for a funeral at a mortuary, in Paris as nationwide confinement continues to counter the COVID-19 virus. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
A man pays respect near the coffin of his wife who was 75-years-old, during a funeral ceremony under the care of Paris undertaker Franck Vasseur, at Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
A man pays respect near the coffin of his wife who was 75-years-old, during a funeral ceremony under the care of Paris undertaker Franck Vasseur, at Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Paris undertaker Franck Vasseur accompanies family members during a funeral ceremony at Pere Lachaise cemetery. Vasseur says that dealing with a flood of virus victims' bodies since March has turned his life into an infernal, head-spinning procession of death and that he feels robbed of his purpose by being unable to comfort families who cannot accompany bodies for cremation or gather in large numbers for funerals. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Paris undertaker Franck Vasseur accompanies family members during a funeral ceremony at Pere Lachaise cemetery. Vasseur says that dealing with a flood of virus victims' bodies since March has turned his life into an infernal, head-spinning procession of death and that he feels robbed of his purpose by being unable to comfort families who cannot accompany bodies for cremation or gather in large numbers for funerals. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
As body after body has passed through his rubber-gloved hands, sealed in double-layered bags for disposal, Paris undertaker Franck Vasseur has become increasingly concerned about the future after the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
As body after body has passed through his rubber-gloved hands, sealed in double-layered bags for disposal, Paris undertaker Franck Vasseur has become increasingly concerned about the future after the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Paris undertaker Franck Vasseur says his job became
Paris undertaker Franck Vasseur says his job became "completely different," a procession of death, disposal and paperwork, of days spent shuttling bodies from A to B, of waiting in line with other hearses and dealing by phone and email with locked-down families he could no longer comfort in person. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Mourners gather around the coffin of an 83-year-old man. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Mourners gather around the coffin of an 83-year-old man. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
An overview of the Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris. The cemetery is the final resting place for a dizzying array of famous names: Edith Piaf, Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison, to cite just those few. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
An overview of the Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris. The cemetery is the final resting place for a dizzying array of famous names: Edith Piaf, Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison, to cite just those few. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
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