0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

This article is more than 2 month old.

Chip shortage could stretch into 2023, says Intel chief; what others feel

Mini

According to Intel Corporation's CEO Pat Gelsinger, the shortage of semiconductors is likely to stretch into 2023.

Chip shortage could stretch into 2023, says Intel chief; what others feel

The shortage of semiconductors — that is affecting manufacturing worldwide for the past several months — is likely to stretch into 2023, says Intel Corporation's chief executive officer Pat Gelsinger.

The acute shortage of semiconductors chips — which started after the pandemic in 2020 — has triggered distress as companies fail to meet the rising demand for a wide range of electronic goods and components. A recent analysis by Goldman Sachs suggested that the global chip supply shortage impacts at least 169 industries.

"It could take one or two years to get back to a reasonable supply-and-demand balance in the semiconductor industry... We have a long way to go yet... It just takes a long time to build

Also read:

Before Gelsinger, several other entrepreneurs and business executives expressed concern over the chip supply disruption.

Last month, Tesla chief Elon Musk said the ongoing microchip shortage was like the scarcity of toilet paper in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic and accepted that it was a huge challenge for his electric car company.

In May this year, Patrick Armstrong, CIO of Plurimi Investment Managers, told CNBC that the chip shortage was likely to last 18 months. "It's not just autos. It’s phones. It’s the internet of everything. There are so many goods now that have many more chips than they ever did in the past," he said.

In a similar vein, Glenn O’Donnell, a vice president research director at advisory firm Forrester, in his blog, wrote that the chip shortage could last until 2023. “Because demand will remain high and supply will remain constrained, we expect this shortage to last through 2022 and into 2023,” his blog read.

Carlos Tavares, CEO of Stellantis, has also said the crisis will stretch into 2022, "The semiconductor crisis, from everything I see and I'm not sure I can see everything, is going to drag into 2022 because I don't see enough signs that additional production from the Asian sourcing points is going to come to the West in the near future."

Meanwhile, Gartner analyst Alan Priestley told CNBC that the situation may improve for some sectors in the next six months, but that there may be a “knock-on effect” into 2022.

In April this year, US President Joe Biden also took cognisance of the issue. Speaking at a virtual summit, he said, "The US needs to address an ongoing shortage of semiconductors by investing in its chip infrastructure."

His statement came after several chief executives — including General Motors CEO Mary Barra, Ford CEO Jim Farley and Stellantis CEO Carlos Tavares, along with Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger and representatives from Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Samsung, HP and other tech firms — held a meeting with White House officials on the issue.