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    Ethiopian air crash: These airlines around the world have grounded Boeing 737 Max aircraft

    Ethiopian air crash: These airlines around the world have grounded Boeing 737 Max aircraft

    Ethiopian air crash: These airlines around the world have grounded Boeing 737 Max aircraft
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    By CNBC-TV18  IST (Updated)

    Mini

    Several airlines around the world have grounded their fleet of Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft as world carriers assessed the situation following the crash of one of the aircraft in Ethiopia.

    After the deadly crash of the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 on Sunday, several airlines have taken a decision to either ground the Boeing aircraft or ensure safety measures are taken up. This is for the second Boeing 737 MAX 8 plane crashed in less than five months. In October 2018, an aircraft operated by Lion Air crashed killing over 180 people in Indonesia.
    Here are the airlines and the countries that have issued statements on the operations of Boeing 737 Max aircraft:
    Colombia
    Colombia's civil aviation authority said on Wednesday it would not allow Boeing Co 737 MAX 8 planes to fly into its airspace after the grounding of the aircraft by several nations, while the cause of the deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airlines plane is investigated.
    The authority said no Colombian airline operates the B737 MAX 8 aircraft but after consultation with other aviation authorities, including the United States Federal Aviation Administration, it would not allow the model to enter its airspace.
    Earlier on Wednesday, Panama's Copa Holdings SA said it would voluntarily suspend operations of its six Boeing 737 MAX 9 aircraft, following a decision by the US air regulator to ground those jets.
    US
    The United States on Wednesday joined Europe, China and other countries in grounding Boeing Co's 737 MAX jets, because of safety concerns after an Ethiopian Airlines plane crash that killed 157 people, the second disaster involving the 737 in less than five months.
    The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) cited new satellite data and evidence from the scene of Sunday's crash near Addis Ababa for its decision to ground the planes.
    US airlines that operate the 737 MAX, Southwest Airlines Co, American Airlines Group Inc and United Airlines, said they were working to re-book passengers.
    Southwest is the world's largest operator of the 737 MAX 8 with 34 jets, while American flies 24 MAX 8s and United 14 MAX 9s.
    Canada
    Canada's transport minister says the country is closing airspace to the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet following the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines jetliner that killed 157 people.
    Canada becomes the latest country to bar the Boeing 737 Max as the investigation into the latest crash, the second in just over five months, is underway.
    Transport Minister Marc Garneau said new information they received Wednesday morning in the form of satellite data shows a possible but unproven similarity to a previous Max 8 crash.
    Boeing has said it has no reason to pull the popular aircraft from the skies and does not intend to issue new recommendations about the aircraft to customers.
    Given the proximity to US Canada's decision to ground the planes may cause problems for US airlines.
    Nigeria and Mauritania
    A Nigerian official says the country has closed its airspace to the Boeing 737 Max 8.
    President Muhammadu Buhari's personal assistant in a Twitter post cites Nigeria's aviation minister as saying the model involved in Sunday's Ethiopian Airlines crash is barred until the cause of the disaster is determined.
    And in Mauritania, civil aviation authorities say Mauritania Airlines has halted its use of the model.
    Thailand
    The Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand says it has ordered the budget airline Thai Lion Air to suspend flying its Boeing 737 Max planes for seven days while it conducts risk assessments and special training for pilots.
    The agency says it will consult with the plane's maker and designer about safety measures. The suspension begins Thursday. It comes after Sunday's Ethiopian Airlines crash.
    Thai Lion Air is the only Thai airline flying B737 Max models.
    The airline is an associate company of Indonesia's Lion Air, which lost a B737 Max 8 in October shortly after takeoff from Jakarta in a crash that killed 189 people.
    Uzbekistan
    Uzbekistan's civil aviation agency on Wednesday barred Boeing 737 Max jets from taking off or landing at local airports for one month, following two fatal crashes involving the aircraft in Indonesia and Ethiopia.
    Egypt
    Egyptian aviation authorities have banned the operation of all Boeing 737 Max aircrafts, citing safety concerns.
    The Egyptian Civil Aviation Authority says in a statement it has barred "flying over, landing and takeoff" of Boeing 737 Max aircrafts.
    It also says Egypt doesn't have these aircraft and that they are not part of its future plans.
    The announcement cites the Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday that killed 157 people on board.
    Lebanon
    Lebanon's state news agency says the country's civil aviation authority has barred flights by Boeing 737 Max aircraft from landing or flying in Lebanese skies following the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines jetliner that killed 157 people.
    Lebanon becomes the latest country to bar the Boeing 737 Max as investigation into the latest crash, the second in just over five months, is underway.
    The decision by Lebanon's head of civil aviation doesn't elaborate on the reason for the banning or the duration. The national air carrier mostly operates Airbus.
    Kosovo 
    Kosovo has barred the Boeing 737 Max 8 and 738 Max 9 airplanes from its airspace following the crash of a similar jetliner in Ethiopia on Sunday in which all 157 on board were killed.
    Kosovo's Civil Aviation Authority said in a Wednesday statement the decision was taken because of "the investigation of the equipment" of the planes, adding that it is effective immediately.
    Hong Kong
    Hong Kong will ban the operation of all Boeing 737 Max aircraft "into, out of and over" the key Asian aviation hub beginning at 6 p.m. (1000 GMT) Wednesday.
    The announcement from the Civil Aviation Department cited the crash of two of the planes within less than five months and said the ban would continue "until further notice."
    The statement said: "The CAD has been closely monitoring the developments, the investigation progress and the information from relevant aviation authorities."
    It said the CAD had noted that the US Federation Aviation Administration has affirmed the planes' airworthiness and that investigations were ongoing.
    It said the department has been in close contact with the FAA and other the relevant organizations, including the two airlines, SpiceJet of India and Russia's Globus Airlines, that use the aircraft to operate flights into and out of Hong Kong International Airport.
    Kazakhstan
    Kazakhstan's civil aviation committee suspended Boeing 737 Max flights starting from Wednesday, it said in a statement, following two fatal crashes involving the aircraft in Indonesia and Ethiopia.
    The committee said only one such jet was registered in the Central Asian nation, belonging to privately-owned Scat airline.
    India
    India on Tuesday banned the use of Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft by the country's airline companies following a deadly crash in Ethiopia involving the US passenger jet.
    "DGCA has taken the decision to ground the Boeing 737-MAX planes immediately. These planes will be grounded till appropriate modifications and safety measures are undertaken to ensure their safe operations," the ministry of civil aviation said in a tweet.SpiceJet has around 12 such aircraft in its fleet, while Jet Airways has five, which are currently grounded.
    Jet Airways said it has grounded its five Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft after a crash in Ethiopia that killed all 157 people on board. The airline said it is not flying any of the 737 Max planes in its fleet and is "in contact with the manufacturer.
    "SpiceJet also said it has suspended Boeing 737 Max operations following DGCA's decision to ground the aircraft. "Safety and security of our passengers, crew and operations are of utmost importance to us and we will be working with the regulator and the manufacturer to attain normalcy in our operations," said Tushar Srivastava, head of communications, SpiceJet.
    New Zealand
    New Zealand and Fiji have suspended Boeing 737 Max 8 flights in and out of the two countries following the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines jetliner.
    The decisions affect only one operator, Fiji Airways. No New Zealand airlines use the Max 8 planes.
    Much of the world, including the entire European Union and Australia, has grounded the Boeing jetliner from their airspace, leaving the United States as one of the few remaining operators of the plane involved in two deadly accidents in just five months.
    Graeme Harris, a director at New Zealand's Civil Aviation Authority, said the decision followed discussions with other aviation authorities.
    Fiji Airways and Fiji's Civil Aviation Authority said they would ground the fleet until more information is known about the cause of the Ethiopian Airlines accident.
    Kuwait
    Kuwait’s Directorate General for Civil Aviation said it is suspending operation of all Boeing 737 Max 8 flights until further notice.
    The DGCA said it is taking the action after two planes of the same type crashed in the past five months.
    The ban applies to all Boeing 737 Max 8 flights, including those in transit, the DGCA said.
    United Arab Emirates
    The United Arab Emirates, a key international travel hub, has barred the Boeing 737 Max 8 and 9 from its airspace following the crash of a similar jetliner in Ethiopia.
    The Emirates' General Civil Aviation administration made the announcement late Tuesday night.
    It cited the similarities between Sunday's Ethiopian Airlines flight and another by Indonesia's Lion Air last year for its decision.
    The budget carrier FlyDubai, owned by the Dubai government, uses the aircraft as a workhorse of its fleet.
    FlyDubai said in a statement "is adjusting its schedule to minimise disruption to passengers."
    It flies 11 Boeing 737 MAX 8s and two MAX 9s.
    European Union
    The European Aviation Safety Agency has issued a directive grounding all Boeing 737 Max 8 and 9 model aircraft following two recent deadly crashes.
    The grounding applies to all European Union airspace.
    The crash in Ethiopia on Sunday came five months after an Indonesian Lion Air jet plunged into the ocean.
    EASA said in its emergency airworthiness directive Tuesday that "at this early stage" of the most recent investigation, "it cannot be excluded that similar causes may have contributed to both events."
    It adds that "based on all available information, EASA considers that further actions may be necessary to ensure the continued airworthiness of the two affected models."
    It says companies may make one noncommercial flight to return their planes to a location where they can be inspected.
    Austria
    Austria announced the suspension of Boeing 737 MAX aircraft over the apparent “massive problems” with the fleet, a statement from Austria’s Transport Minister Norbert Hofer said on Tuesday. Hofer added that “safety is a top priority” and the decision to ground the aircrafts was made “on the basis of the facts currently available.”
    Italy
    Italy is joining other European countries in closing its airspace to Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft.
    The Italian Civil Aviation Authority says aircraft of that type cannot operate to and from airports in Italy starting at 9 p.m. local time (2000 GMT) on Tuesday, until further notice.
    The authority says the measure is precautionary, given the lack of "reliable information" regarding the cause of the crash of the Ethiopian Airlines jet shortly after takeoff on Sunday.
    The European Aviation Safety Agency has just issued a directive grounding all Boeing 737 Max 8 and 9 model aircraft. It applies to all European Union airspace.
    Poland
    Poland's state carrier LOT says it is grounding its five Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft.
    Several airlines in Europe and around the world have grounded the planes after a fatal crash in Ethiopia on Sunday and one in Indonesia last year.
    LOT received its first Boeing 737 Max 8 in December 2017. It plans to have 15 such planes by January 2020.
    Turkish Airlines
    Turkish Airlines says two Britain-bound Boeing 737 Max flights are returning to Istanbul after British airspace was closed to the aircraft.
    A company official told The Associated Press on Tuesday the planes — one heading for London and the other for Birmingham — were about to land in Istanbul after being diverted back. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly.
    The company earlier announced that it was grounding all 12 Boeing 737 Max aircraft in its fleet until further notice.
    — Suzan Fraser in Ankara, Turkey
    Bermuda
    Bermuda has prohibited Boeing's 737 MAX 8 and 737 MAX 9 aircraft from its airspace until further notice following Sunday's deadly plane crash in Ethiopia, the British overseas territory's aviation authority said on Tuesday.
    The Netherlands
    The Dutch government has followed several other European nations in closing its airspace to the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft that was involved in two recent fatal crashes.
    Infrastructure and Water Ministry spokesman Roel Vincken says the government decided to close its airspace on Tuesday following advice from the Dutch aviation authority.
    France, Britain and Germany also have announced airspace closures after the crash on Sunday of a Boeing 737 Max 8 in Ethiopia and another crash in October by the same model of plane in Indonesia.
    Germany 
    Germany's transport ministry says the country is closing its airspace to Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, following a similar decision by Britain.
    The ministry confirmed to news agency dpa on Tuesday comments made by Transport Minister Andreas Scheuer to n-tv television.
    The broadcaster quoted Scheuer on its website as saying safety is the priority, and "until all doubts are cleared up, I have ordered that German airspace be closed for the Boeing 737 Max with immediate effect."
    Germany joins a rapidly growing number of nations and carriers either grounding the planes or barring them from their airspace.
    Icelandair
    Icelandair Group says it has temporarily suspended operations of its three Boeing 737 Max aircraft until further notice.
    President and CEO Bogi Nels Bogason said Tuesday that the company will follow developments closely and work with local, European and US authorities on any steps that need to be taken.
    Bogason said, however, that based available information, Icelandair's safety processes and the training of its crew, the company is confident of the safety of the aircraft.
    He said the temporary suspension won't impact the company's operations, as it only affects three aircraft out of a fleet of 33.
    France
    The French Civil Aviation Authority has joined several other nations and closed French airspace to all Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft.
    In a statement Tuesday, the authority says that "France is carefully following the progress of the inquiry" relating to the Ethiopian Airlines plane crash in Addis Ababa on Sunday that left 157 people dead.
    It says French airline companies do not possess any of the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft.
    But as a precautionary measure, French authorities have decided to "forbid all commercial flights on a Boeing 737 Max departing from, traveling to, or flying across, France."
    Ireland
    Irish aviation authorities have suspended all variants of Boeing 737 Max aircraft into and out of Ireland's airspace as European aviation regulators respond to recent crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia.
    Irish authorities say they made the decision "based on ensuring the continued safety of passengers and flight crew."
    The decision comes shortly after UK civilian aviation authorities took a similar step, motivated by the lack of information coming from the flight data recorder involved in the Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday.
    Experts are chasing details on why the plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 on board. But answers could take months and regulators are taking steps in the interim.
    Norway
    Norwegian Air Shuttle says it has grounded its Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft on recommendation from European aviation authorities after Sunday's Ethiopian Airlines crash.
    The Norwegian carrier has 18 of the planes.
    Tomas Hesthammer, the low-cost carrier's acting chief operating officer, says that "the safety and security of our customers and colleagues will never be compromised, and once authorities advise to cease operations we will of course comply."
    A growing number of airlines and countries around the world have grounded the planes.
    UK
    British regulators have grounded Boeing 737 Max aircraft following the Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday.
    The UK Civil Aviation Authority says in a statement Tuesday that though it had been monitoring the situation, it had as a precautionary measure "issued instructions to stop any commercial passenger flights from any operator arriving, departing or overflying UK airspace."
    Some five 737 Max aircraft are registered and operational in the United Kingdom, while a sixth had planned to commence operations later this week.
    Several countries have now grounded the planes.
    Experts are chasing details on why the plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 on board. Answers could take months.
    TUI Airways
    TUI Airways -- one of the UK's largest air carriers -- just issued a statement confirming that all of its 737 MAX 8 aircraft operating in the UK have been grounded.
    That decision follows guidance from the UK regulatory authorities, the carrier said.
    It added, "Any customers due to fly home today on a 737 MAX 8 from their holiday will be flown back on another aircraft. Customers due to travel in the coming days will also travel on holiday as planned on other aircraft. The safety and wellbeing of our customers and staff has remained our primary concern."
    Malaysian Airlines
    Malaysian authorities say all flights by Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft into and out of the country have been suspended following two fatal crashes involving the jet in less than five months.
    The Civil Aviation Authority said in a short statement Tuesday that no Malaysian carriers operate the Max 8, but that foreign airlines are banned from flying the plane in Malaysia, and from transiting in the country, until further notice.
    A number of airlines and countries around the world have grounded the planes after a fatal crash in Ethiopia on Sunday and one in Indonesia last year.
    Australia
    Australia has suspended all flights into or out of the country by Boeing 737 Max aircraft, the type that was involved in Sunday's Ethiopian Airlines crash.
    Australia's Civil Aviation Safety Authority says no Australian airlines operate the aircraft type, but two foreign airlines — SilkAir and Fiji Airways — fly them to Australia.
    It says Singapore-based SilkAir has already suspended operation of its 737 Max aircraft.
    The Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 people on board. Five months earlier, a similar Indonesian Lion Air jet plunged into the ocean, killing 189.
    The Australian civil aviation authority's director of aviation safety, Shane Carmody, says that because of the two accidents, the temporary suspension of Boeing 737 Max operations is in the best interest of safety.
    FlyDubai
    Mideast budget airline FlyDubai says it will continue to fly Boeing 737 Max 8 and 9 aircraft after reviewing a recent US regulator statement about the aircraft.
    Several airlines around the world have grounded the planes after a fatal crash in Ethiopia on Sunday and one in Indonesia last year.
    The US Federal Aviation Administration said Monday that while others have drawn similarities between the Indonesia and Ethiopia crashes, the agency was not. The FAA also said that no later than April it expects Boeing will complete changes, including new training for pilots in automated anti-stall technology that is suspected of playing a role in the Indonesia crash.
    FlyDubai said Tuesday that "no further action is required at this time" over the aircraft, which is a workhorse in the Dubai government-owned carrier's fleet.
    FlyDubai' statement Tuesday comes after it said Monday that it remains "confident in the airworthiness of our fleet."
    FlyDubai operates 11 Boeing 737 Max 8 and two Boeing Max 9 jetliners.
    South Korea
    A South Korean airline says it will suspend operations of its two Boeing 737 Max 8 planes, the same aircraft involved in the Ethiopian Airlines plane crash that killed 157 people.
    An Eastar Jet official said Tuesday that the planes will be replaced by Boeing 737-800 planes from Wednesday on routes to Japan and Thailand. She didn't want to be named, citing office rules.
    She says the airline hasn't found any problems, but is voluntarily grounding Boeing 737 Max 8s in a response to customer concerns. She says the planes will not be used until the completion of a government safety review on the aircraft.
    An official from South Korea's Transportation Ministry says it has yet to find any problems from safety reviews on Eastar's planes that started Monday.
    Singapore
    Singapore's civil aviation authority says it has temporarily banned all Boeing 737 Max planes from entering and leaving the country.
    It noted in a statement on Tuesday that there have been two fatal accidents involving the aircraft in less than five months. Sunday's deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 killed all 157 people on board.
    The authority said the suspension starting later Tuesday will be "reviewed as relevant safety information becomes available.
    "The suspension will affect SilkAir, a regional carrier that's wholly owned by Singapore Airlines. It has six Boeing 737 Max 8 planes.
    The authority said that flights to Singapore by China Southern Airlines, Garuda Indonesia, Shandong Airlines and Thai Lion Air will also be affected.
    Aerolíneas Argentinas
    Argentina's Aerolíneas Argentinas has suspended B737 MAX 8 operations on Tuesday. The airline operates 5 Boeing 737 Max 8 aircrafts.
    Aerolineas says it made the decision after a joint analysis with Argentina's civil aviation authority ANAC.
    Gol Airlines, Brazil
    Brazil's Gol Airlines is suspending the use of its 121 Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft following the deadly Ethiopian Airlines crash involving the same airplane.
    The company said in a press release Monday night that as of 8 p.m. local time it would be temporarily stopping the commercial use of the airplanes.
    The statement says Gol is fully confident in Boeing's safety operations and it is following updates about the investigation into the 737 Max 8 in order to return the aircraft to use as soon as possible.
    Gol says that since it started using the Boeing 737 Max 8 last June, the aircraft have made nearly 3,000 flights with "total security and efficiency."
    Aeromexico
    The Mexican airline Aeromexico says it is suspending flights with its six Boeing 737 Max 8 jetliners following the crash of a Max 8 aircraft in Ethiopia that killed 157 people.
    The company says it trusts "fully" in the safety of its fleet but adds that the grounding has been ordered to ensure "the safety of its operations and the peace of mind of its customers.
    "A statement issued on Monday evening says the airline is in communication with Boeing as well as aviation authorities about the plane model. It says other planes will take over the flights usually flown by its Max 8 jets.
    Fiji Airways
    Fiji Airways says it will continue flying its two Boeing 737 Max 8 planes to Pacific destinations.
    Some airlines have grounded their Max 8 planes after an Ethiopian Airlines jetliner crashed on Sunday, killing 157 people. Another Max 8 plane crashed in Indonesia last year.
    Fiji's national carrier said in a statement Tuesday it's following the situation closely and has full confidence in the airworthiness of its fleet. The airline says it mainly uses the MAX 8 planes on routes connecting Fiji, Australia and New Zealand.
    New Zealand's Civil Aviation Authority said Fiji Airways was the only carrier landing MAX 8 planes in New Zealand and it could continue doing so.
    Oman
    Oman says it is "temporarily suspending" flights by Boeing 737 Max aircraft at its airports after the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines jetliner of the same type.
    The Public Authority for Civil Aviation made the announcement Tuesday.
    State-owned Oman Air operates five Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft. Oman is a sultanate on the eastern edge of the Arabian Peninsula.
    The crash of the Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 on Sunday killed 157 people. A similar Lion Air plane crashed in Indonesia in October, killing 189 people.
    Airlines around the world have begun grounding the aircraft as an investigation into Sunday's crash continues.
    Indonesia
    Indonesia has grounded Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes for inspections following the Ethiopian Airlines crash, the second for the new aircraft since October.
    Director General of Air Transportation Polana B. Pramesti said the grounding was taken to ensure flight safety in Indonesia. He said the inspections will ensure the planes are airworthy.
    The crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX 8 killed 157 people Sunday. A Lion Air model of the same plane crashed in Indonesia in October, killing 189 people.
    There are currently 11 MAX 8 planes operated by airlines in Indonesia including 10 by Lion Air and 1 by national carrier Garuda.
    China
    China's aviation regulator said on Monday it had ordered Chinese airlines to suspend their Boeing Co 737 MAX aircraft operations by 6 p.m. (1000 GMT) following a deadly crash of a 737 MAX 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines.
    The Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) said in a statement it would notify airlines as to when they could resume flying the jets after contacting Boeing and the US Federal Aviation Administration to ensure flight safety.
    "Given that two accidents both involved newly delivered Boeing 737-8 planes and happened during take-off phase, they have some degree of similarity," the CAAC said, adding that the order was in line with its principle of zero-tolerance on safety hazards.
    Chinese airlines have 96 737 MAX jets in service, the state company regulator said on Weibo.
    Caijing, a Chinese state-run news outlet that covers finance and economics, said many flights scheduled to use 737 Max planes would instead use the 737-800 models.
    Ethiopian Airlines
    A spokesman says Ethiopian Airlines has grounded all its Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft as a safety precaution.
    Asrat Begashaw said Monday that although it is not yet known what caused the crash on Sunday, the airline decided to ground its remaining four 737 Max 8 planes until further notice as "an extra safety precaution."
    Ethiopian Airlines was using five new 737 Max 8 planes and was awaiting delivery of 25 more.
    Begashaw said searching and digging to uncover body parts and aircraft debris will continue. He said forensic experts from Israel have arrived in Ethiopia to help with the investigation.
    Cayman Airways
    Cayman Airways says it is temporarily grounding the two Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft it operates in the wake of an Ethiopian Airlines crash involving the same plane model.
    The Caribbean carrier said the grounding would take effect Monday. While he acknowledged the cause of the Ethiopian crash was unclear, airline President and CEO Fabian Whorms said the airline was taking the step because of its "commitment to putting the safety of our passengers and crew first.
    "He said the move would lead to scheduling changes as the carrier copes with aircraft shortages.
    Cayman received its first Max 8 in November and it is second just this month.
    The airline is the flag carrier of the Cayman Islands, a British Overseas Territory.
    Comair
    Comair, the operator of British Airways and Kulula flights in South Africa says it has grounded its Boeing 737 Max 8 while it consults with Boeing, other operators and technical experts.
    A statement does not say how many planes are affected. It says the decision was made without intervention from regulatory authorities.
    Comair joins a number of other airlines in grounding the planes after Sunday's deadly crash in Ethiopia.
    Wrenelle Stander, executive director of Comair's airline division, says in the statement that Comair "remains confident in the inherent safety of the aircraft."
    Royal Air Maroc
    An official at Royal Air Maroc says Morocco has halted the commercial use of its sole operational Boeing 737 Max 8, pending tests and examinations of the airplane after the Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday.
    The official, who spoke anonymously in line with his department rules, said the plane was scheduled to fly on Monday from Casablanca to London but was replaced.
    The official said the plane, in use since December, was undergoing an "inspection and verification" procedure by a Moroccan team and would be operational after tests are done.
    The official said Royal Air Maroc received a second Boeing 737 Max 8 airplane a few days ago, part of a deal with Boeing for acquiring a total of four.
    American Airlines
    The US carrier has 24 737 MAX 8 aircraft in its fleet and said that it has no plans of grounding the Boeing Max 737 aircraft at the moment.
    In a statement, American Airlines expressed its condolences to the families of those killed and said it would continue to monitor the investigation into the crash, CNN reported.
    "At this time there are no facts on the cause of the accident other than news reports," read the statement. "We have full confidence in the aircraft and our crew members, who are the best and most experienced in the industry."
    Southwest Airlines
    Another US carrier that has 34 of the aircraft in its fleet said it does not plan to change its operational policies or procedures.
    "We remain confident in the safety and airworthiness of our fleet of more than 750 Boeing aircraft," read a statement from the airline.
    Norwegian Airlines
    Norwegian Airlines will continue to operate its 18 Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft as normal, according to Tomas Hesthammer, director of flight operations.
    "We are in close dialogue with Boeing and follow their and the aviation authorities' instructions and recommendations," Hesthammer said in a statement. "Our passengers' safety is and will always be our top priority."
    WestJet
    Canadian airline WestJet said it has 13 MAX 8 aircraft and a total of 121 Boeing 737s in its fleet.
    "We are monitoring the situation closely and will not speculate on the cause of the incident," the airline said in a statement. "WestJet remains confident in the safety of our Boeing 737 fleet including our 13 MAX-8 aircraft first introduced in 2017."
    (With inputs from agencies)
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