0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

This article is more than 2 year old.

India to demand simulator training for all Boeing MAX pilots

Mini

Boeing's fastest-selling model, the MAX aircraft, was grounded worldwide in March following safety concerns after a second fatal crash involving this aircraft. While the first tragic crash was a Lion Air flight in late October 2018, the second one was that of Ethiopian Airlines in March this year.

India to demand simulator training for all Boeing MAX pilots
India's civil aviation regulator will demand simulator training for all the pilots of the country who are certified to operate the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, a senior official said.
The Directorate General of Civil Aviation will also conduct its own checks once the plane is certified by the US regulator Federal Aviation Administration as it wants to be one hundred percent sure about the aircraft before allowing it to resume operations in Indian skies, the official added.
While DGCA has said in the recent past that it will be conservative in a resumption of MAX service in India, customer SpiceJet is optimistic of the aircraft's return soon.
"They have fixed the issues in MCAS (flight control system of the aircraft called Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System). They have told us that the plane will fly again by November. The certification process should be completed by October," a senior executive at SpiceJet said on condition of anonymity.
The sole Indian customer of MAX continues to remain optimistic about the return of MAX to service. SpiceJet has a total order-book of 205 planes, out of which 155 are firm orders and 50 are options.
The 12 MAX aircraft of SpiceJet, which have already been inducted, are grounded since March after a global grounding of this aircraft type post two fatal accidents.
Boeing's fastest-selling model, the MAX aircraft, was grounded worldwide in March following safety concerns after a second fatal crash involving this aircraft. While the first tragic crash was a Lion Air flight in late October 2018, the second one was that of Ethiopian Airlines in March this year.
In July, the US aviation regulator FAA had found a new potential risk in Boeing's MAX family of aircraft and had asked the company to mitigate it.
next story