EV companies found guilty of gaming testing should face strongest punishment: Auto expert

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EV Fires: A source in the testing agency Automotive Research Association of India (ARAI) told CNBC-TV18.com that while almost all companies submit grade-A cells for testing, many may not be necessarily using the same in all the vehicles produced and sold.

EV companies found guilty of gaming testing should face strongest punishment: Auto expert
Reacting to CNBC-TV18's special investigation on electric vehicle fires that revealed that some EV companies may have submitted Grade A cells for testing but used lower quality cells in products for sale, auto industry expert Arun Malhotra said that there should be extremely stringent penalties or punishments for those involved in such practices if found guilty.
"There should be — and there have been — very stringent penalties or punishments for difference in what you show and what you produce... If there is a gap, strict and strongest possible punishment needs to be given," said Malhotra in a discussion with CNBC-TV18.
A source in the testing agency Automotive Research Association of India (ARAI) told CNBC-TV18.com that while almost all companies submit grade-A cells for testing, many may not be necessarily using the same in all the vehicles produced and sold. He refused to identify any firm that might be doing so.
A government source also said that the possibility of companies indulging in such practices could not be ruled out.
"Can't rule out the possibility of different cells being submitted for testing and actual usage. There is a need to strongly enforce surprise checks to prevent companies from using B grade cells. All data regarding the cells, their quality, price and place of purchase is available with companies,” the government source said.
Malhotra also said that it was easy to check whether batteries sent for testing are same as those being used.
"As far as vehicles with different cells in the market are concerned, that can easily be checked out either from the plant, from the dealer stock or from the market," he said.
According to him, testing of batteries needs to be rigorous and wider. "I think there is a lot of thought which needs to be given into this."
He added that the government's action on EV batteries should be comprehensive and should have a "360-degree perspective.
Queries sent by CNBCTV18.com to companies including Okinawa, Ola, Jitendra and Pure EV remained unanswered.
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